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Art websites: where science and technology collide with art

This week's selection highlights the websites of institutions and organizations that are helping artists to blur the lines between art, science and technology.

Ars Electronica - http://new.aec.at/news/en/
Ars Electronica comprises an avant-garde arts festival, a "showcase of excellence" competition, a museum for digital art and media culture and a media art lab for research and development.

Boston Cyberarts - http://www.bostoncyberarts.com/
The Boston Cyberarts organization runs the biennial Boston Cyberarts Festival, the Axiom Center for New and Experimental Media and Art Technology New England (ATNE). The website also hosts a number of web-based projects.

FILE - http://www.file.org.br/
FILE (Electronic Language International Festival) is a new media arts festival held in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Porto Alegre and selected regions around the globe.  

TED - http://www.ted.com/talks/tags/id/144
TED, an acronym for Technology Entertainment Design, brings together scientific pioneers, visionaries, artists and provocateurs from around the world for its famous talks. The short talks are later hosted online and can be viewed for free.

Leonardo - http://www.leonardo.info/
Both Leonardo and the International Society for the Arts Sciences and Technology's joint goal is to create "opportunities for the powerful exchange of ideas between practitioners in art, science and technology." The two linked organizations encompass print journals, books, electronic publications, conferences, collaborative projects and websites that facilitate communication between artists and encourage "the innovative presentation of technology-based arts."

Electronic Arts Intermix - http://www.eai.org/
Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is an online resource of video and media art. EAI has collected more than 3,500 new and historical video and digital art works spanning the mid-1960s to the present day and boasts one of the most comprehensive video art collections in the world.