Arifa Akbar: We're desperate to know everything we can about Banksy - except who exactly he is

A critical view

There's a flurry of new books on Banksy. The loquaciously named Banksy: You Are an Acceptable Level of Threat and if You Were Not You Would Know About It is published in June but in the meantime, you can read the one his friend's just published, or the one a former journalist's bringing out next month.

I don't know what's led to this synergy in tributes to the street artist, but what unifies them is the paradox by which we regard him: we, his audience, seem to have an unquenchable desire to know all about him – that he once had a New York girlfriend, that he was aloof and gangly in his youth, that his publicist's from Brighton – all the voyeuristic minutiae. Yet what we don't want to know is who he is.

These latest books deliver on this. The authors of the long-winded title say they will not be uncovering his real identity. Banksy's friend, Robert Clarke, says in Seven Years with Banksy, that he has no desire to unmask the graffiti artist either. Will Ellsworth-Jones, the former Sunday Times journalist, agrees that "we all enjoy the mystery" of his anonymity in Banksy:Behind the Wall.

They're right. Who can remember the Mail on Sunday expose in 2008 featuring a photograph (which had done the rounds in various media since 2004) of an ordinary looking guy in early middle age called Robin Gunningham? This was probably Banksy, the newspaper claimed. We were so disappointed at his apparent outing that we chose to ignore it, to forget about it and go back to reading and writing about the great art hologram he has become. Even news journalists seemed to cotton on and go quiet.

We don't want Banksy unmasked. His anonymity, with its titillating edge of counter-cultural illegality, sells big-time, partly because it feeds our fantasies of cloaked superheroes. He's the Zorro of the art world, as Clarke points out. The outed Banksy is far more pedestrian so we collude in keeping the paper bag over his head.

He must keep his side of the bargain which can't be all that easy. Banksy un-outed, though, is a super-cool brand gilded by the romance of its mystery. His tag commands high prices at auctions and galleries. Celebrities lap it up. And so what? There's nothing wrong with a street artist coming in from the cold. If Banksy sells well at Lazarides and Bonhams, then Blek le Rat – his apparent inspiration – sells in similar spaces, as did Basquiat in his lifetime.

The place where a work hangs doesn't have to undermine its rawness, whether it's a millionaire's mansion or a dank foot-tunnel. It is not to knock Banksy's achievement to simply acknowledge that his commercial ambition is as sharp as a brand-savvy artist's like Damien Hirst. It's not surprising to read in Clarke's book that the young Robin (Banksy) was in awe of Hirst, returning from one of his first New York shows with stars in his eyes.

Hirst and Banksy have a lot in common, even if they appear to have chosen diametrically opposing trajectories – one grabbing the limelight, the other abjuring it. Both are brilliant showmen with an eye for spectacle, both have a knack for making money, and more importantly, both have managed to maintain their mega-fame over the decades by outdoing their past stunts. And they have deliberately inverted their identities – the graffiti artist stuck his work up in the Louvre and the Tate; meanwhile the YBA who has an army of gallerists to do his bidding, punted his own works at Sotheby's.

Latterly, both artists have been accused of selling out, Hirst, for earning huge sums of money while posing as an enfant terrible, and in the case of Banksy, well, we don't know exactly how rich and respect-able this Slim Shady's become, but we can't pretend that he's a young punk sporting a Billabong hat and a spray can.

We know as little of Banksy as we want to know – just enough to keep the romance alive – and thankfully, these latest books don't seem to give us much more than that.

From Young Turk to dirty old Millais

The Young British Artists at 50 is a picture book that shows just how far the gang has come – snapshots of Gavin Turk with his young kids, etc. It's funny how quickly a generation converts itself from punks to parents. The original "shock" merchants were the pre-Raphaelites who took Europe by storm. A Tate Britain exhibition will show us how in September. Their work abounded with "steamy sexuality" at a time when piano legs were covered up. Today's audiences might need to decode the canvas for the shocking bits. Some pointers: look out for the, um, gushingly erect sugar tumbler in Millais's Isabella and for Joseph's dirty fingernails in Christ in the House of his Parents.

Take stories as read, and anew

I wish adults read aloud to each other more often. I was sitting through the annual World Book Night celebrations at London's South Bank Centre this week, where authors very movingly read passages from novels, and I suddenly felt five years old again. I'd read many of the stories already, but I'd missed some of the beauty of the passages. I got a lump in my throat as Elif Shafak read the opening pages of Honour even though it hadn't elicited tears that early on when I'd read it. Andrea Levy put on her best Caribbean accent for Small Island and brought out the book's wicked humour that I'd hurtled past to get to the end. Reading a novel aloud might sound like the slower way to experience it, but ironically, it's a faster way into its imaginary world. It amplifies the experience. There's a special kind of pleasure, and absorption, that comes, and the last time I'd felt this was probably at primary school, as James and the Giant Peach unwound before my ears.

Arts and Entertainment
Word master: Self holds up a copy of his novel ‘Umbrella’
books
Arts and Entertainment
Hare’s a riddle: Kit Williams with the treasure linked to Masquerade
books
Arts and Entertainment
The man with the golden run: Daniel Craig as James Bond in 'Skyfall'

TV
Arts and Entertainment
'Waving Seal' by Luke Wilkinson was Highly Commended in the Portraits category

photography
Arts and Entertainment
The eyes have it: Kate Bush
music
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Art
Arts and Entertainment
Diana Beard, nicknamed by the press as 'Dirty Diana'

Bake Off
Arts and Entertainment
The X Factor 2014 judges: Simon Cowell, Cheryl Cole, Mel B and Louis Walsh

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Gregg Wallace was caught by a camera van driving 32mph over the speed limit

TV
Arts and Entertainment
books
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Iain reacts to his GBBO disaster

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Outlaw Pete is based on an eight-minute ballad from Springsteen’s 2009 Working on a Dream album

books
Arts and Entertainment
Cara Delevingne made her acting debut in Anna Karenina in 2012

film
Arts and Entertainment
Simon Cowell is less than impressed with the Strictly/X Factor scheduling clash

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Gothic revival: artist Dave McKean’s poster for Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination
Exhibition
Arts and Entertainment
Diana Beard has left the Great British Bake Off 2014

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Lisa Kudrow, Courtney Cox and Jennifer Anniston reunite for a mini Friends sketch on Jimmy Kimmel Live

TV
Arts and Entertainment
TVDessert week was full of the usual dramas as 'bingate' ensued
Arts and Entertainment
Clara and the twelfth Doctor embark on their first adventure together
TVThe regulator received six complaints on Saturday night
Arts and Entertainment
Vinyl demand: a factory making the old-style discs
musicManufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl
Arts and Entertainment
David Baddiel concedes his show takes its inspiration from the hit US series 'Modern Family'
comedyNew comedy festival out to show that there’s more to Jewish humour than rabbi jokes
Arts and Entertainment
Puff Daddy: One Direction may actually be able to use the outrage to boost their credibility

music
Arts and Entertainment
Suha Arraf’s film ‘Villa Touma’ (left) is set in Ramallah and all the actresses are Palestinian

film
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

    US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
    Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
    Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
    Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

    The big names to look for this fashion week

    This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
    Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
    Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

    Neil Lawson Baker interview

    ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
    The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

    The model for a gadget launch

    Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
    Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
    Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

    Get well soon, Joan Rivers

    She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
    Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

    A fresh take on an old foe

    Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering