Books: Cover Stories

WITH SIR Edward Heath on the road until Christmas, signing everything that moves, I gather that two other Tory scribblers are now fully occupied on their memoirs. John Major, like Lady Thatcher, is working with HarperCollins and will publish next autumn. He claims to have written 80,000 words - in longhand, as befits the PM of warm beer and spinsters cycling to church. Michael Heseltine (like Heath, with Hodder) is 59,000 words in and, as befits a man with monogrammed gates, he is dictating his thoughts. Old Oxford chum Anthony Howard will make sense of his ramblings.

u

SINCE STUART Proffitt stomped out of HarperCollins over the Chris Patten affair and fetched up at Penguin, everyone has been anxiously awaiting his first acquisitions. (The only project known to be on his desk is Charles Moore's biography of the blessed Margaret, but that's not due to be published until she has been well and truly kicked upstairs.) This week brought word that he has acquired the pensees of George Walden, the former Conservative member for Buckingham and a former chairman of the Booker judges. His published canon includes a book on ethics and foreign policy and another on education.

u

ALAN CLARK, the member for Kensington and Chelsea who (lust aside) usually has more time for animals than people, is turning out in a good cause next Tuesday. He will launch Voices, a double cassette of readings by local celebrities in aid of the Kensington & Chelsea Talking Newspaper, celebrating its 10th anniversary. Voices includes John Cleese reading from G K Chesterton, Diana Rigg from Elizabeth Jane Howard, P D James from her own work, and Hugh Whitemore from Paddington. Everyone has given their talents for free and Lord Puttnam describes the anthology (Polygram OutLoud, pounds 7.99) as having "a cast in a million".

u

LOOK OUT soon for the British debut of Quist books for children. Launched in the US by the leather-clad Harlin Quist, who arrived in New York 50 years ago with $20 and two suitcases, his picture books have won numerous awards and are said to have revolutionised children's publishing. Inaugural titles here include Bus 24 and The Geranium on the Windowsill Just Died.

u

GOOD NEWS amid the bad for Richard Cohen. The eponymous independent admitted defeat last week, having lost pounds 500,000 of his own money. But Metro Books, another independent run by ex-Faberite Susanne McDadd, is taking on both Cohen and his list, including Al Alvarez's autobiography Where Did It All Go Right? Interesting question.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksAn evocation of the conflict through the eyes of those who lived through it
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

    Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

    Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
    Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

    Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

    When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
    5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

    In grandfather's footsteps

    5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
    Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

    Martha Stewart has flying robot

    The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
    Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

    Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

    Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
    A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

    A tale of two presidents

    George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
    Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

    The dining car makes a comeback

    Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
    Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

    Gallery rage

    How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
    Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

    Eye on the prize

    Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
    Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

    Women's rugby

    Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
    Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

    The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

    With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
    Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

    How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

    As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
    We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

    We will remember them

    Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
    Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

    Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

    Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
    Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

    Acting in video games gets a makeover

    David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices