Books paperbacks: Tigger's take on the Shakespeare of prose

The Day Star of Liberty: William Hazlitt's Radical Style

by Tom Paulin

Faber pounds 10.99

Prose doesn't stick in the way that poetry does; and while Hazlitt's poetical contemporaries - Keats, Shelley - have held on to a central place on the curriculum, "the Shakespeare prose-writer of our glorious country" (William Bewick's description) has been pushed out to the margins. Both OUP and Penguin publish decent selected works, but otherwise there is nothing readily available to the general reader.

This may have to do with the sort of writer and the sort of man he was - thorny, egotistical, sensual, content to offend contemporary opinion even when he wasn't actively eager to do so. That is why, as Ronald Blythe writes in the introduction to his Penguin selection, assessments of Hazlitt have "a certain maggoty quality and are eaten through with reservation". But his absence from our consideration is surely attributable, too, to the demands of the curriculum: poetry, being denser, can bear the weight of criticism more easily than prose, so it's the poets who get written about and considered.

But what Paulin does in this brilliant, almost overpowering book is to subject Hazlitt's style to the kind of microscopic scrutiny usually reserved for poets. He picks out the intense imagery and themes with which his "plain-speaking" prose is shot through, and shows how notions of movement, elasticity and electricity inform the style - much space is devoted to metrical analysis of the writing, picturing out the sharp rhythms which for Hazlitt were as important a weapon as the words themselves. The bedrock of Paulin's argument is that the seizing energy in Hazlitt's writing is not to be separated from his radical political views: the son of an Irish Unitarian minister, he was steeped in the culture of "rational dissent", but added to it a delight in the irrational, the grotesque. Paulin's own Tiggerish style is finely tuned to his subject.

It isn't an easy book to read, at least at the start, when it's hard to see where Paulin's ricocheting arguments are leading. And his belief in the Shakespearean complexity of Hazlitt's language sometimes leads him into contention: he baldly states that a phrase of Hazlitt's, "Being, sense, and motion", picks up Claudio in Measure for Measure ("This sensible warm motion") - a weak echo, which could owe as much to reading Locke and Hobbes as to Shakespeare. But still, this is criticism of rare passion which recognises that literature is not something to bury your nose in but part of life.

Russia's War

by Richard Overy

Penguin pounds 8.99

Antony Beevor's Stalingrad may have walked off with all the prizes, and it is a thoroughly gripping piece of story-telling; but if you seriously want to get a handle on the blind prodigality of the Eastern Front in the Second World War, Overy's book is the place to start. Overy has all Beevor's flare for drama, combined with a far sharper sense of historical context - he shows how Stalin's Soviet Union was in many respects a consequence of tsarist oppression and civil war, and while Overy's Stalin is still monstrous, he becomes a comprehensible, perhaps even a necessary monster. He covers much more ground than Beevor, far more concisely, and it costs four quid less.

Pleasured

by Philip Hensher

Vintage pounds 6.99

Assured and elegant, Hensher's story of lives intersecting in Berlin in the months before the fall of the Wall is an impressive attempt to come to grips with the event. This Berlin is, like Isherwood's, a moral backwater, sufficiently cut off from the wash of events for its inhabitants to drift: Friedrich drinks too much and runs a fake drug deal; Peter Picker photocopies interesting news stories and goes to parties; Daphne finds purpose in pointless revolutionary "actions". Unfortunately, at times Hensher himself won't let things slide - a feverish child turns out, predictably, to have meningitis; an East German defector is, of course, a Stasi informant. He tries to fit just a little too much in, and there's a sense of strain that his elegance can't quite compass.

Another World

by Pat Barker

Penguin pounds 6.99

One of the characters here believes that "you should go to the past, looking not for messages or warnings, but simply to be humbled by the weight of human experience that has preceded the brief flicker of your own few days ..." The weight of human experience bears down heavily on all the characters in this book: 101-year-old Geordie, a Somme veteran approaching death; his grandson Nick and his children, whose fraught relationships are diagrammatised in a savage, century-old mural under the wallpaper. Barker's sense of history is strong; the qualification is that her vision of the present, with its socially excluded council estates, violent computer games and quarrelsome extended step-families, is too consciously topical.

The Stone Book Quartet

by Alan Garner

Flamingo pounds 6.99

Garner's best-known books - the children's novels Elidor, The Owl Service, The Weirdstone of Brisingamen - have all been concerned with exposing a magical, mythic stratum underlying the everyday, especially in his own corner of Cheshire. This short sequence continues the job at a more realistic level, telling how one family passes down the generations a sense of craft - the craft of the stonemason or the blacksmith. The stories are simply written, and at one level are an old-fashioned parable of the dignity of the working-man, the need to see history as the aggregate of ordinary lives. But they are charged with another layer of meaning: for Garner, craft is less a technical skill than a sense of our kinship with, and indebtedness to, the soil.

Slow Motion

by Dani Shapiro

Bloomsbury pounds 7.99

How a nice Jewish girl from New Jersey ended up as the mistress of her best friend's stepfather: Shapiro's memoir has everything you expect from an account of 1980s excess - the sex, the cars, the swish hotels, the jewels, the drink, the coke, the FBI investigation. Most importantly, there's the repentance, the realisation (when her father dies and her mother is terribly injured in a car crash) that her life is all wrong ... Shapiro tries to have her cake and eat it, showing off all this ersatz glamour then getting smug about how she chucked it and became a talented writer. In fact, she traded in excessive drug use for excessive writing: overliterary and appallingly self-conscious, this is a book to avoid.

Suggested Topics
Arts and Entertainment
Matthew Healy of The 1975 performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset

music
Arts and Entertainment
booksThe Withnail and I creator, has a new theory about killer's identity
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Arts and Entertainment
tvDick Clement and Ian La Frenais are back for the first time in a decade
Arts and Entertainment
The Clangers: 1969-1974
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Rocky road: Dwayne Johnson and Carla Gugino play an estranged husband and wife in 'San Andreas'
film review
Arts and Entertainment
Nicole Kidman plays Grace Kelly in the film, which was criticised by Monaco’s royal family

film
Arts and Entertainment
Emilia Clarke could have been Anastasia Steele in Fifty Shades of Grey but passed it up because of the nude scenes

film
Arts and Entertainment
A$AP Rocky and Rita Ora pictured together in 2012

music
Arts and Entertainment
A case for Mulder and Scully? David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson in ‘The X-Files’

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Impressions of the Creative Community Courtyard within d3. The development is designed to 'inspire emerging designers and artists, and attract visitors'

architecture
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010

GlastonburyWI to make debut appearance at Somerset festival

Arts and Entertainment
Lena Headey as Cersei Lannister

TV reviewIt has taken seven episodes for Game of Thrones season five to hit its stride

Arts and Entertainment
Jesuthasan Antonythasan as Dheepan

FilmPalme d'Or goes to radical and astonishing film that turns conventional thinking about immigrants on its head

Arts and Entertainment
Måns Zelmerlöw performing

Eurovision
Arts and Entertainment
Graham Norton was back in the commentating seat for Eurovision 2015

Eurovision
Arts and Entertainment
Richard Hammond, Jeremy Clarkson and James May on stage

TV
Arts and Entertainment
The light stuff: Britt Robertson and George Clooney in ‘Tomorrowland: a World Beyond’
film review
Arts and Entertainment
Reawakening: can Jon Hamm’s Don Draper find enlightenment in the final ‘Mad Men’?
tv reviewNot quite, but it's an enlightening finale for Don Draper spoiler alert
Arts and Entertainment
Breakfast Show’s Nick Grimshaw

Radio
Arts and Entertainment

Eurovision
Arts and Entertainment
'Youth' cast members Paul Dano, Jane Fonda, Harvey Keitel, Rachel Weisz, and Michael Caine pose for photographers at Cannes Film Festival
film
Arts and Entertainment
Adam West as Batman and Burt Ward and Robin in the 1960s Batman TV show

Comics
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Syria civil war: The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of this endless conflict

    The harrowing testament of a five-year-old victim of Syria's endless civil war

    Sahar Qanbar lost her mother and brother as civilians and government soldiers fought side by side after being surrounded by brutal Islamist fighters. Robert Fisk visited her in Latakia
    9 best women's festival waterproofs

    Ready for rain: 9 best women's festival waterproofs

    These are the macs to keep your denim dry and your hair frizz-free(ish)
    On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

    On your feet!

    Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
    Liverpool close in on Milner signing

    Liverpool close in on Milner signing

    Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
    With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

    The big NHS question

    Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
    Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

    Thongs ain't what they used to be

    Big knickers are back
    Thurston Moore interview

    Thurston Moore interview

    On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
    In full bloom

    In full bloom

    Floral print womenswear
    From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

    From leading man to Elephant Man

    Bradley Cooper is terrific
    In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

    In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

    Dame Colette Bowe - interview
    When do the creative juices dry up?

    When do the creative juices dry up?

    David Lodge thinks he knows
    The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

    Fashion's Cher moment

    Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
    Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

    Health fears over school cancer jab

    Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
    Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

    'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

    Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
    Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

    Weather warning

    Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report