The 10 Best guides to teens

Whether your teenager is a diva, a door-slammer or downright demonic, there’s a book out there to help you

1. Divas & Door Slammers by Charlie Taylor

£10.99, eburypublishing.co.uk

In a Mumsnet favourite, Taylor clearly explains how to avoid parent-teen relationships ending up on a downward spiral.

2. How to Talk So Kids Will Listen by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish

£11.99, piccadillypress.co.uk

The message is simple: keep the communication lines with your son or daughter open.

3. Help! My Teenager is an Alien by Sarah Newton

£10, penguin.co.uk

Sarah Newton, who hosted the ITV series My Teen's a Nightmare, advises on breaking down the barriers between parents and children.

4. Surviving the Terrible Teens, edited by Roni Jay

£7.99, crimsonbooks.co.uk

Two psychologists and a youth worker have put their heads together to come up with this guide to how to teens think.

5. Parenting a Teen Girl by Lucie Hemmen

£12.99, newharbinger.com

A psychologist explains how to raise happy and confident adolescent girls, without stress.

6. Family Lives website

familylives.org.uk/gotateenager

OK, so this is not a book, but it is one of the most helpful resources for parents of teens around, with advice lines and online forums.

7. The Terrible Teens by Kate Figes

£16.99, penguin.co.uk

Figes doesn't just concern herself with how to handle your teen, she also gives a practical analysis of the difficulties of growing up today.

8. Raise a Happy Teenagerby Suzy Hayman

£9.99, teachyourself.co.uk

Counsellor Suzy Hayman offers easy-to-follow advice on conflict points and how talking and negotiating can help solve them.

9. Teenagers by Rob Parsons

£8.99, hodder.co.uk

Parsons gives clear-sighted advice on coping with this disruptive time, while also giving a series of tips on maintaining relationships as your son or daughter grows up.

10. Whatever! By Gill Hines & Alison Baverstock

£8.99, piatkusbooks.net

Advice on how to raise the thorny topics of sex, drugs and alcohol with your adolescent, and how much independence is too much.

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