Letter from Belfast: Belfast, North Carolina

LIONEL SHRIVER was born in North Carolina and grew up in New York City, but she has lived in Belfast since 1987. Her most recent novel, Ordinary Decent Criminals, has just been published in paperback (Flamingo, pounds 5.99). An active and dedicated novelist with two previous books published, Shriver never had any doubts: 'I decided that I wanted to be a writer when I was seven years old.' She finally left the US in 1985 to travel. 'I took a six-month bicycle trip around Europe and that was the first time I went to Ireland. I lived in Israel for a while, then came back to Ireland in 1987. Apart from a year spent in Kenya, I've lived in Belfast ever since.'

Ordinary Decent Criminals is best described as a post-Troubles novel: its action is placed in late-Eighties Belfast, long after the momentum of the Sixties and Seventies unrest has dissipated. Shriver elaborates: 'The novel looks at the situation now. I've listened to people talk about the Sixties and Seventies days. But as far as I can see it's not the same now. The perception from abroad is that this place never changes; that history has become calcified. Yet even in the six years I've lived here I've noticed big differences.

'I think some people tend to have a curiously nostalgic relationship with the early Troubles. A lot has changed. But parts of Northern Ireland have developed an addiction to the excitement and media attention. And I'm not convinced that as weary as people say they are of turmoil that they really want it to go away. If they don't love the Troubles, they can at least endure them.'

Ordinary Decent Criminals is set in Belfast during 1987 and '88. The city has a jaded atmosphere: what began as a spontaneous, morally-driven civil rights campaign has degenerated into a grim attritional routine. The novel centres on how two malcontents try to resolve their inner conflicts against the backdrop of historical deadlock. 'The main characters like to play elaborate games,' Shriver says. 'This allows them to avoid making commitments or decisions. The Troubles themselves have become a game; so much so that what they end up being about is who wins and who loses rather than what they win or lose.'

Shriver doesn't rely on the glamour of violence or political intrigue for dramatic effect: she consciously shuns the hackneyed Ulster fiction plots - the Romeo and Juliet romance yarn and the IRA-bomber- with-a-heart-of-gold cliche. 'Many passages deal with how people manage their feelings in relation to the external historical conflict. But it's not just a Joycean ramble through their minds.'

The background details and dialogue ring very true to life; and the story is anchored in a recognisable Belfast. Shriver was able to infiltrate the local ethos and quickly assimilate its culture. 'Most of my research was done first-hand by direct contact with local people and events. If someone used an expression I didn't understand I asked them to explain it and noted it down. People were generally enthusiastic and helpful - they thought it was fun explaining their own sayings. The language says as much about Northern Ireland as the politics. It's got great life, imagination, music and humour. I did a certain amount of background reading initially to get a good sense of the situation here. But I think that too much academic research is dangerous for fiction writers because the material can become dull.'

Many American readers were confused. This didn't surprise Shriver. 'I don't think it was terrifically accessible to Americans. It's very difficult to write about the politics for foreign readers - you have to continually explain details. The authenticity of the book's details ended up being a disadvantage in the States. The expressions I loved, nobody understood.'

Humour is a vital element in the novel. Shriver has a mischievous, hard-edged wit which borders on the cynical. 'I try to expose everyone involved in the conflict. It was a great creative advantage that my own dark humour and the local sense of the ridiculous coincided. I can identify with that temperamentally. It's one of the reasons I'm still here.

'I was aiming for an even-handed disrespect: to offend as many different groups as possible - ideally all of them, so that no-one was left out. I was flattered to be simultaneously accused of being anti-republican and republican. I was very amused when a historian, writing in The Times, called me a 'typical American republican sympathiser'.'

The author's indifferent comic perspective is best revealed in the novel's 'Glossary of Troublesome Terms' - originally added to the American version and retained in the UK edition. Doubling as an often hilarious guide to Ulster politics and an astute mini-essay on the complicated nature of the situation, the glossary contains the kind of home truths which have eluded political analysts for decades.

Shriver doesn't see herself as a Troubles Writer. She has no illusions about becoming a Belfast-based novelist, and has a realistic attitude to living here. 'There's a degree of outsiderness that I try to deliberately maintain. I like to leave regularly, if only to go to London for a few days, because suddenly Northern Ireland disappears. If you stay here solidly it closes in on you. It's valuable to be able to pull back from the situation now and again and see its real world perspective.'

For now, Shriver is content to be a participant in ordinary decent Belfast life - a resident alien who continues to absorb the city's eccentric atmosphere. Apart from occasional trips to New York, Shriver lives and works at her secluded house in South Belfast. She plays squash, goes out to restaurants and bars and reads until the early hours. Her fourth novel, called Game Control and set in Kenya, is due out in 1994.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Pedro Pascal gives a weird look at the camera in the blooper reel

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Public vote: Art Everywhere poster in a bus shelter featuring John Hoyland
art
Arts and Entertainment
Peter Griffin holds forth in The Simpsons Family Guy crossover episode

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Judd Apatow’s make-it-up-as-you-go-along approach is ideal for comedies about stoners and slackers slouching towards adulthood
filmWith comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
Arts and Entertainment
booksForget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Arts and Entertainment
Off set: Bab El Hara
tvTV series are being filmed outside the country, but the influence of the regime is still being felt
Arts and Entertainment
Red Bastard: Where self-realisation is delivered through monstrous clowning and audience interaction
comedy
Arts and Entertainment
O'Shaughnessy pictured at the Unicorn Theatre in London
tvFiona O'Shaughnessy explains where she ends and her strange and wonderful character begins
Arts and Entertainment
The new characters were announced yesterday at San Diego Comic Con

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Rhino Doodle by Jim Carter (Downton Abbey)

TV
Arts and Entertainment
No Devotion's Geoff Rickly and Stuart Richardson
musicReview: No Devotion, O2 Academy Islington, London
Arts and Entertainment
Christian Grey cradles Ana in the Fifty Shades of Grey film

film
Arts and Entertainment
Comedian 'Weird Al' Yankovic

Is the comedy album making a comeback?

comedy
Arts and Entertainment
While many films were released, few managed to match the success of James Bond blockbuster 'Skyfall'
film
Arts and Entertainment
Jamie Dornan as Christian Grey in the first-look Fifty Shades of Grey movie still

film
Arts and Entertainment
Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, centre, are up for Best Female TV Comic for their presenting quips on The Great British Bake Off

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in the TV adaptation of 'Fargo'

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Shakespeare in Love at the Noel Coward Theatre
theatreReview: Shakespeare in Love has moments of sheer stage poetry mixed with effervescent fun
Arts and Entertainment
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson stars in Hercules

film
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'

film
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

    The air strikes were tragically real

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns
    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

    Britain as others see us

    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

    Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
    How did our legends really begin?

    How did our legends really begin?

    Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
    Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz
    A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

    A new Russian revolution

    Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
    Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
    Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

    Standing my ground

    If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
    Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

    Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

    The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
    The man who dared to go on holiday

    The man who dared to go on holiday

    New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

    For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
    The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

    The Guest List 2014

    Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
    Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

    Jokes on Hollywood

    With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on