British holiday hostages

Tourists kidnapped in the past five years
Click to follow
The Independent Culture
Miles Croston, 28, from Bucks and Paul Ridout, 26, from Dorset, and Rhys Partridge, 27,from Suffolk, were kidnapped in New Delhi, India, by the Muslim extremist group Al-Hadad on 22 October 1994. The three Britons were released on 1 November 1994, after being held for ten days.

Mark Slater, 28, from London, was captured by Khmer Rouge guerrillas with two other young tourists, Australian David Wilson, 29, and Frenchman Jean Michel Braquet, 27, on 26 July 1994 in a train ambush in which 13 people died. The men were held for two months in Kampot province, 90 miles south of Phnom Penh while the rebels demanded a ransom of pounds 100,000. This was later dropped in favour of a demand to France, Australia and the US to end military aid to Cambodia. The men were believed to have been shot dead in September 1995, although no bodies have been recovered.

Kim Housego, 16, and David Mackie, 36, both from London, were taken from a group of foreign tourists herded together by 20 militants along a well-known trekking route in Kashmir on 6 June 1994. Kim was snatched from his parents and Mr Mackie from his new wife, Kathy. The abductors were believed to be Kashmiri Muslims who belonged to a secessionist organisation known as Harakat-ul-Ansar. Both were released 17 days later, on 23 June.

Dominic Chappell, 25, from London, and Tina Dominy, 24, from Kent, were seized with Chappell's Australian girlfriend, Kellie Wilkinson, also 24, in Cambodia on 11 April 1994 as they travelled from Sihanoukville to Phnom Penh. The Khmer Rouge demanded pounds 100,000 ransom, which was not paid. Human remains recovered from the area in July 1994 suggest that the three tourists were murdered while in captivity.

Anna Young, 22, and Michael Paterson, 21, both students from Manchester University, were kidnapped by the Kurdish Workers' Party from their bus in Kozluk, southeast Turkey, on 22 August 1993. They were held and then abandoned by their captors two days later after a shoot-out between the rebels and Turkish government forces.

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks, and released on 11 August 1993.

by Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

Kim Housego, 16, and David Mackie, 36, both from London, were taken from a group of foreign tourists herded together by 20 militants along a well- known trekking route in Kashmir on 6 June 1994. Kim was snatched from his parents and Mr Mackie from his new wife, Kathy. The abductors were believed to be Kashmiri Muslims who belonged to a secessionist organisation known as Harakat-ul-Ansar. Both were released 17 days later, on 23 June.

Dominic Chappell, 25, from London, and Tina Dominy, 24, from Kent, were seized with Chappell's Australian girlfriend, Kellie Wilkinson, also 24, in Cambodia on 11 April 1994 as they travelled from Sihanoukville to Phnom Penh. The Khmer Rouge demanded pounds 100,000 ransom, which was not paid. Human remains recovered from the area in July 1994 suggest that the three tourists were murdered while in captivity.

Anna Young, 22, and Michael Paterson, 21, both students from Manchester University, were kidnapped by the Kurdish Workers' Party from their bus in Kozluk, southeast Turkey, on 22 August 1993. They were held and then abandoned by their captors two days later after a shoot-out between the rebels and Turkish government forces.

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks, and released on 11 August 1993.

by Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

Mark Slater, 28, from London, was captured by Khmer Rouge guerrillas with two other young tourists, Australian David Wilson, 29, and Frenchman Jean Michel Braquet, 27, on 26 July 1994 in a train ambush in which 13 people died. The men were held for two months in Kampot province, 90 miles south of Phnom Penh while the rebels demanded a ransom of pounds 100,000. This was later dropped in favour of a demand to France, Australia and the US to end military aid to Cambodia. The men were believed to have been shot dead in September 1994, although no bodies have been recovered.

Kim Housego, 16, and David Mackie, 36, both from London, were taken from a group of foreign tourists herded together by 20 militants along a well-known trekking route in Kashmir on 6 June 1994. Kim was snatched from his parents and Mr Mackie from his new wife, Kathy. The abductors were believed to be Kashmiri Muslims who belonged to a secessionist organisation known as Harakat-ul-Ansar. Both were released 17 days later, on 23 June.

Dominic Chappell, 25, from London, and Tina Dominy, 24, from Kent, were seized with Chappell's Australian girlfriend, Kellie Wilkinson, also 24, in Cambodia on 11 April 1994 as they travelled from Sihanoukville to Phnom Penh. The Khmer Rouge demanded pounds 100,000 ransom, which was not paid. Human remains recovered from the area in July 1994 suggest that the three tourists were murdered while in captivity.

Anna Young, 22, and Michael Paterson, 21, both students from Manchester University, were kidnapped by the Kurdish Workers' Party from their bus in Kozluk, southeast Turkey, on 22 August 1993. They were held and then abandoned by their captors two days later after a shoot-out between the rebels and Turkish government forces.

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks, and released on 11 August 1993.

by Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

Anna Young, 22, and Michael Paterson, 21, both students from Manchester University, were kidnapped by the Kurdish Workers' Party from their bus in Kozluk, southeast Turkey, on 22 August 1993. They were held and then abandoned by their captors two days later after a shoot-out between the rebels and Turkish government forces.

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks, and released on 11 August 1993.

by Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks. Released 11 August 1993.

Dominic Chappell, 25, from London, and Tina Dominy, 24, from Kent, were seized with Chappell's Australian girlfriend, Kellie Wilkinson, also 24, in Cambodia on 11 April 1994 as they travelled from Sihanoukville to Phnom Penh. The Khmer Rouge demanded pounds 100,000 ransom, which was not paid. Human remains recovered from the area in July 1994 suggest that the three tourists were murdered while in captivity.

Anna Young, 22, and Michael Paterson, 21, both students from Manchester University, were kidnapped by the Kurdish Workers' Party from their bus in Kozluk, southeast Turkey, on 22 August 1993. They were held and then abandoned by their captors two days later after a shoot-out between the rebels and Turkish government forces.

David Rowbottom, 28, from Manchester,was on a world cycling tour with Tania Miller (Australian/British, also 28), his fiancee and cousin, when they were kidnapped by Kurdish separatists (PKK) in eastern Turkey on 8 July 1993. They were taken at gunpoint, detained for five weeks, and released on 11 August 1993.

by Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

Comments