Chess

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Grandmaster Chandler laments the brilliancy that got away.

White: Murray Chandler

Black: Franz Nijboer

Lloyds Bank Masters 1992

1. e4 d6 2. d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. f4 Nc6 5. Be3 Nf6 6. Nf3 0-0 7. Be2 e6 8. Qd2 Ne7 9. 0-0-0 b6 10. h4]?

Until now, my play was a standard aggressive plan against Black's restrained set-up, but this idea, playing for a direct attack, was invented at the board.

10 . . . Bb7 11. h5

Offering a choice of pawns. 11 . . . Nxh5 gives White an automatic attack with Qe1, g4 and Qh4, so my opponent captured the more important centre pawn.

11 . . . Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Bxe4 13. Ng5 Bxg2

It looks risky for Black to open lines, but the elimination of this pawn is important for the defence. Now he can entrench a knight on f5 without having to worry about its being kicked away with g4.

14. Rh2 Bb7

In view of what happens, perhaps Black should consider 14 . . . Bd5

15. c4 Bb7.

15. hxg6 hxg6 16. Ba6]]?

The idea is to lure Black's bishop from control of h1, while unblocking the queen's route to h2. After 16 . . . Bxa6, I saw two promising continuations: 17. Rh8+]? Bxh8 18. Qh2 seems to lead to a draw after 18 . . . Kg7 19. Qh7+ Kf6 20. Ne4+ Kf5 21. Ng3+ Kf6, while 17. Rdh1]? Nf5 (17 . . . Bb7? 18. Rh8+ Bxh8 19. Qh2 Kg7 20. Qh6+ Kf6 21. Nh7+ leads to mate.) 18. Rh7 with a good attack, though I have still found no more than a draw.

16 . . . Bd5

My opponent claimed that he played this in an attempt to win, but it is very dangerous for Black.

17. c4 f6 18. cxd5 fxg5 19. dxe6 d5 20. Rdh1 Qd6 21. fxg5 Qxe6 22. Bf4

White has emerged a pawn behind but with a dangerous attack based on the threat of Be5. Black should have played 22 . . . Nc6, but went on a dubious adventure.

22 . . . Qc6+? 23. Kb1 b5 24. Qe3?

24. Be5] was the right move, when 24 . . . Bxe5 25. dxe5 Qxa6 26. Rh8+ Kf7 27. Qf4+ Nf5 28. e6+] gives a winning attack.

24 . . Rxf4] 25. Qxe7 Rf7]

25 . . . Qxa6 would now have lost to 26. Rh8+] Bxh8 27. Qh7+ Kf8 28. Qxh8+ Ke7 29. Qg7+ Rf7 30. Re1+.

26. Qa3] Rb8 27. Qh3] Kf8?

Instead 27 . . . Rf5 was the right way to meet the threat of Qh8+. Both players were now desperately short

of time.

28. Bc8] Qc4 (see diagram) 29. Be6?? Rf4 White lost on time.

A long time later, we discovered that I had missed a mate in five with 29. Qh8+] Bxh8 30. Rxh8+ Ke7 31. Re1+ Qe2 32. Rxe2+ Kd6 33. Re6 mate.

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