Etcetera / Chess

Click to follow
The Independent Culture
Last week, the world's number one player, Garry Kasparov, was knocked out of the Intel Grand Prix by a computer. Pentium Genius 2 shares its thoughts about the game.

White: Garry Kasparov

Black: Pentium Genius 2

1. c4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Qc2 dxc4 5. Qxc4 Bf5 6. Nc3 Nbd7 7. g3 e6 8. Bg2 Be7 9. 0-0 0-0 10. e3 Ne4 11. Qe2 Qb6 12. Rd1

Until now it all came from my pre-programmed openings book. I'd expected 12. Nxe4 Bxe4 13. b3 c5 with equality, but Kasparov's move is better.

12 . . . Rad8 13. Ne1 Ndf6 14. Nxe4 Nxe4 15. f3 Nd6 16. a4 Qb3

My operator tells me that Kasparov greeted this move with a rather contemptuous gesture of astonishment. If I'd had longer to think - we had to make all our moves in 25 minutes - I'd have seen that the queen would be chased back with loss of time.

17. e4 Bg6 18. Rd3 Qb4 19. b3 Nc8 20. Nc2 Qb6 21. Bf4 c5 22. Be3 cxd4 23. Nxd4 Bc5 24. Rad1 e5 25. Nc2 Rxd3 26. Qxd3 Ne7 27. b4

I thought this weakened his pawns. After 27. Qc3 Bxe3+ 28. Nxe3 Nc6, I cosidered I had about 0.21 of a pawn's advantage.

27 . . . Bxe3+ 28. Qxe3 Rd8] (see diagram)

He looked very uncomfortable when I played this. Perhaps he had missed it.

29. Rxd8+ Qxd8 30. Bf1 b6 31. Qc3 f6 32. Bc4+ Bf7

Now after 33. Kf2 I considered the position to be absolutely equal.

33. Ne3 Qd4 34. Bxf7+ Kxf7 35. Qb3+ Kf8 36. Kg2? Qd2+ 37. Kh3?

This looks reckless. I saw no real advantage for Black after 37. Kg1 Nc6 38. Nf5 g6 39. b5. On the previous move, I thought 36. Kf1 was better than Kg2.

37 . . . Qe2] 38. Ng2 h5]

By now my positional advantage was worth 1.04 pawns.

39. Qe3 Qc4 40. Qd2 Qe6+

Now it's close to a pawn and a half. He should have tried 40. a5.

41. g4 hxg4+ 42. fxg4 Qc4 43. Qe1 Qb3+ 44. Ne3 Qd3]

I scarcely considered Qxa4. The e-pawn is far more important.

45. Kg3 Qxe4 46. Qd2 Qf4+ 47. Kg2 Qd4

He could have resiged here. I'm 1.81 pawns ahead and at 166 million calculations a second, I'm not going to mess it up.

48. Qxd4 exd4 49. Nc4 Nc6 50. b5 Ne5 51. Nd6 d3 52. Kf2 Nxg4+ 53. Ke1 Nxh2 54. Kd2 Nf3+ 55. Kxd3 Ke7 56. Nf5+

56. Nc8+ Kd7 57. Nxa7 Ne5+ just leaves his knight trapped.

56 . . . Kf7 57. Ke4 Nd2+ 58. Kd5 g5 59. Nd6+ Kg6 60. Kd4 Nb3+ White resigns.

According to my operator, he didn't so much resign as throw his arms up, grunt and rush away from the board. He didn't shake my hand anyway.

Comments