ETCETERA / CHESS

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The Independent Culture
THE tenth Short-Kasparov game was a great missed opportunity for Nigel Short. William Hartston analyses the one that

got away.

White: Short

Black: Kasparov

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bc4 e6 7. Bb3 Nbd7 8. f4 Nc5 9. Qf3 b5

10. e5 is now met by Bb7.

10. f5 Bd7 11. fxe6 fxe6 12. Bg5 Be7 13. 0-0-0

Short spent more than 50 minutes on this move.

13 . . . 0-0 14. e5 Nfe4

Kasparov thought only five minutes over these last two moves, which seems either over-confident or disrespectful to

wards Short's long think. 14 . . . dxe5? 15. Nxe6] is good for White, but after the game both players indicated that 14 . . . Nd5] 15. Bxe7 Nxe7 was the safe way to continue.

15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Nxe4]

The point of White's play. Short has correctly judged that he will obtain more than enough compensation for the queen.

16 . . . Rxf3 17. exd6 Nxb3+ 18. Nxb3 Qf8 19. gxf3 Qxf3?]

This lets White gain a total bind. 19 . . . Bc6 looks better.

20. Nec5 Bc6 21. Rhe1 e5 22. d7]

22. Rxe5?? would have lost the rook to Qf4+, but this powerful move adds to Black's troubles.

22 . . . Rd8 23. Rd6] a5 24. a3 a4 25. Nd2 Qg2 26. c3 Bd5 27. Nd3 Bb3 28. Nxe5 Qxh2

Black has no way to hold up the d-pawn in the long term.

29. Nc6] Qxd6 30. Re8+ Kf7 31. Nxd8+ Kg6 (see diagram)

White can win here with 32. Re6+] Bxe6 33. Nxe6 since Qxe6 lets the pawn queen and Qxd7 loses the queen to Nf8+. Short's move is equally good.

32. Ne6 Qh2 33. Nf4+

I do not see a perpetual check for Black after 33. d8=Q Qg1+ 34. Nf1 Qxf1+ 35. Kd2 but the question is academic since 33. Rf8] is simple, meeting any check with Rf1.

33 . . . Kh6 34. Nd3 Qg1+ 35. Re1

Perhaps Short had intended 35. Ne1, before noticing 35 . . . Qg4] threatening both Qxd7 and Qd1 mate. But he is still winning.

35 . . . Qg5 36. Ne5

36. Rh1+ Kg6 37. Ne5+ Kf5 38. Nc6 wins at once.

36 . . . g6 37. Rf1

This finally lets it slip. 37. Nc6 Qf5 threatens mate on c2, but White wins with 38. Ne4 Qxd7 39. Rh1+ Kg7 40. Rxh7+] Kxh7 41. Nf6+.

37 . . . Be6 38. Nf7+ Bxf7 39. Rxf7 Qd5 40. Re7 Qd6 41. Rf7 Qd3 42. Ne4 Qe3+ 43. Nd2 Qd3 draw agreed.

Even in the final position, White could try for a win with 44. Nf3 Qe3+ 45.

Kd1 Qd3+ 46. Ke1, but after the earlier

accidents he cannot be blamed for

taking a draw.

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