Film: Double Bill

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The Independent Culture
PAUL McGUIGAN, DIRECTOR OF `THE ACID HOUSE' ON HIS IDEAL CINEMATIC PAIRING

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (KEN HUGHES, 1968)

GET CARTER (MIKE HODGES, 1971)

CHITTY CHITTY Bang Bang is one of my favourite films. It is a cute musical. But it's more of a spooky fairy tale. You never know where, or at what time, it's set. It uses such simple effects but they have a great impact. It's one of those things I liked as a child and my son, Seamus, who is four and a half, went through six months of watching it at least once a week.

There are these really, really surreal bits; for instance, the child catcher. I don't know if there has ever been such an evil character in a children's film. He does that brilliant little dance and then there is his sweetie truck. It was probably quite innocent, but now you think of this man enticing children into his car with sherbets and it's actually very horrible.

As a film-maker, I would love to do a kid's movie. I know people would think that's strange, but it would be a great challenge to keep them entertained.

In Get Carter, Michael Caine plays a London gangster who goes to Newcastle because his brother has been killed there. He wants to discover why and he finds out that his niece has been forced into making a porn movie. The film's style is modern and urban and its use of location is amazing, especially in the final scene where Caine is chased around a slag heap. Like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, it's a very modern way of film making.

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