FILM: THE FIVE BEST FILMS

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The Independent Culture
Strangers on a Train (PG)

Robert Walker and Farley Granger swap murders for an accelerating fairground-ride thriller. Perhaps the most quintessentially Hichcockian of all Alfred's outings. See New Films, left

Another Day in Paradise (18)

More white-trash junkie madness from low-life chronicler Larry (kids) Clark. Hint: that misleading title comes lathered in irony. See New Films, left

The Third Man (PG)

Carol Reed's perfect Viennese waltz; dancing arm in with Orson Welles to the busy sounds of Anton Karas' zither.

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (12)

Catchphrases and moonbases. High adventures and crooked dentures. All in a day's work for Mike Myers' shagadelic superhero.

Place Vendome (15)

Nicole Garcia's velvety Parisian thriller provides a showcase for the cut-glass skills of an on-form Catherine Deneuve.

THE FIVE BEST REVIVALS

Fanny and Alexander (Lux, tomorrow, 3pm)

Ingmar Bergman's devastating fairytale of childhood goes from light (the family Christmas) to dark (the Bishop's house) to out-and-out otherworldly (the puppet shop). It's a masterpiece all the way.

Notorious (Ritzy, tomorrow, 2pm)

One of Hitchcock's finest, this dark romantic thriller has Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman uncovering Nazi uranium in Rio de Janeiro.

Fists in the Pocket (NFT, Thur, 7.30pm)

Marco Bellocchio's incendiary black-and-white family album, scarcely faded from when it first scandalised straitlaced Sixties Italy. Anti-hero Lou Castel smoulders like a young Brando.

The Cameraman (Curzon Soho, tomorrow, 1.45pm)

While a shade less good than The General and Steamboat Bill Jr, this giddy film about film-making still offers rich testament to Buster Keaton's lugubrious brand of silent-screen artistry.

Bonnie and Clyde (NFT, Fri, 7.30pm)

Thirties gangsters as Sixties icons: Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway vogue and strut their way through Arthur Penn's groundbreaking true-crime caper.

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