Gabby Sidibe shows her Precious mettle

The Oscar-nominated star of last year's sleeper hit tells Kaleem Aftab about her new role, opposite comedy hero Eddie Murphy

It has almost become a default reaction when talking about Gabourey "Gabby" Sidibe to mention how pretty she is. It has reached the stage where one suspects that adults are now trying to make up for their childhood playground taunts at the fat kid in class and are trying to prove that now they've matured they can see that big can be beautiful.

Yet it's not the size or looks of the 27-year-old that are her most impressive claim to fame. Plucked from the streets of Harlem, this unknown actress came out of nowhere to be nominated for an Academy Award for her acting debut in Precious, and so became one of only eight African-American women to be nominated for the big prize at the Oscars.

In that film she played the title role in the adaptation of Sapphire's book about an illiterate, obese 16-year-old girl with two children fathered by her rapist father. It had everything to do with Sidibe's performance that the film became the sleeper hit of 2010.

The two big questions that arise whenever anyone comes in from the cold are whether they are going to be one-hit-wonders or a staple on our cinema screens over the next decade. The indications are that Sidibe is going to be a big star of our screens for a long time to come.

She is a star on the Showtime TV series The Big C, playing the mouthy, combative, student Andrea Jackson, and has also hosted Saturday Night Live. Now the cinema acting gigs are arriving fast. First up is Yelling to the Sky and then the Promised Land of Hollywood blockbusters is reached with a starring role in Brett Ratner's Tower Heist. It's easy to see why director Victoria Mahoney would want the Brooklyn-born star to appear in Yelling to the Sky. The film, like Precious, is about a young girl struggling to survive in New York City, although this time Sidibe is playing the bully and aggressor rather than the victim. In another connection with Precious, Yelling to the Sky stars Zoë Kravitz, daughter of Lenny Kravitz, the rocker who played Gabby's unlikely boyfriend in Precious.

Sidibe says that, having known Zoë Kravitz for some time, it was weird to play her enemy. "Being mean to each was definitely not a plus of this part. That's a strange aspect of being in this film together, because we play enemies and that can get really strange, and we are both sensitive people with plenty of emotion, and the emotion we have to get into in order to have to get into this and fight is very hard to do with someone that I love, and someone that I care about, and someone that doesn't bitch – and that is really strange, but it was really cool to hang out on set and be able to do girl talk: that was best part for me."

After she shot the scene in which they fight with each other, she admits that she and her co-star broke down, crying. It's another example of the amazing intensity that she brings to her role. The irony is that the vibes she gives out off screen could not be more different to those displayed by the characters on screen. She is always cracking jokes and seems incredibly smart.

She has made a seamless jump into stardom. The star says of her post-Oscar nomination life: "First of all I got this film, Yelling to the Sky, well before Precious came out and so I was already kind of in the midst of the beginning of my career. After the Oscars I started The Big C and now I'm doing Tower Heist, it's a lot like it was before the Oscars when I was just this working actress, and this wave that I seem to be on seems like such a grand thing for those on the outside, but because I'm on the wave, it doesn't feel like a wave but more like life."

She tries to downplay the life-changing aspect that has come about in the

past year: "My life is kind of normal as a working actress. It's not normal for a teacher or student, but it's kind of normal for a working actress."

It's only when pressed that she admits that it's a little out of the ordinary to be recognised everywhere she goes. "More people know me than I know them and that is not normal," she says. "It's certainly is strange and it's not without its scariness. It makes me feel strange to say that I have fans and it makes me feel strange to say that I'm a celebrity, because I don't believe that I am. I just think that I'm a girl with a job that everyone can see."

It's then she finally starts on the downside, and her fame in America becomes apparent.

"I walk around New York and I ride buses and stuff like that, but I do it at a much slower pace, because every fifth person I meet I have to hug, or sign autographs or take pictures and things like that. I wear a hat and sunglasses so I don't have to do it as much. But I still get recognised. I was in a store with my face completely hidden except for my chin and someone comes up to me and says "Are you Gabby?" and I was like, 'Really! How do you know who I am from this chin?" I guess what I'm trying to say is that I'm as normal as anyone can be for someone who was on every TV screen last year."

One suspects Sidibe's frame may have also helped the starry-eyed fan to spot the talent. But with fame also comes great interest. So much, in fact, that she says that she has to turn the TV off when she sees herself on screen. It's a big difference to the woman I met for the first time a year ago, just as Precious was premiering at Cannes, when she said: "I love it, especially the red carpet... I like doing it because every time I've got to go and do make-up"

Now the actress is asked to give a daily commentary on her life, from the lip-gloss she wears to speculation about her boyfriend. She has successfully kept him out of the media, stating that he's a normal guy, but the media in the US went crazy last month when she was spotted at a basketball game with her beau. He was not famous and fans and media became obsessed with trying to find out his name. So – who is her boyfriend? In a heartbeat Gabby gives a response that completely renders the line of questioning futile while also raising a laugh: "I'm dating Colin Firth," she jokes. "We were trying to keep it secret, he is going to be so mad at me. I need you to know that we are dating and it's all about the Oscars." Later on in the conversation her phone vibrates and when she looks at it, she quips, "Oh Colin's calling again, ah baby, he misses me."

It's a brilliant example of her sense of humour, which, she quips naturally, was "bought on eBay." It also helped her handle all those Oscar parties, "It was one long party, and I wasn't really concerned with winning and losing because there is no time machine that I could have jumped in to go back and make my performance any better. But at the same time, it was like if you have 10 office parties in a month, at some point you say 'Christ, another party'. It was so exhausting and I was so excited about the Oscars just because it meant the end of everything and I could finally switch off. I went home and slept for 30 hours straight as soon as the ceremony was over."

Her sense of comic timing has also been recognised by Hollywood, and she has just completed filming her first big Hollywood film, Tower Heist, in which she stars with Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy, Matthew Broderick and Casey Affleck. All she says about the plot is that it's about workers in a building trying to steal from the "big cheese" and that she's in on the crime. It was, she says, a test of her self-confidence and, especially, her ability to be funny.

"I was really worried because a lot of my scenes are with Eddie Murphy, and all I could think about is Raw, and how genius he is in that with his red leather suit, and he's so funny, and I was so nervous about what it would be like to film with him. I'm toning it down today but I am actually quite a raunchy and crazy person, and on this film I was allowed to be a crazy person."

'Yelling to the Sky' is out later this year

Arts and Entertainment
Victoria Wood, Kayvan Novak, Alexa Chung, Chris Moyles
tvReview: No soggy bottoms, but plenty of other baking disasters on The Great Comic Relief Bake Off
Arts and Entertainment
80s trailblazer: comedian Tracey Ullman
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Stephen Tompkinson is back as DCI Banks
tvReview: Episode one of the new series played it safe, but at least this drama has a winning formula
Arts and Entertainment
TV
News
Graham Norton said Irish broadcaster RTE’s decision to settle was ‘moronic’
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Attenborough with the primates
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Former Communards frontman Jimmy Somerville
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Arts and Entertainment
Secrets of JK Rowling's Harry Potter workings have been revealed in a new bibliography
arts + ents
Arts and Entertainment
Fearne Cotton is leaving Radio 1 after a decade
radio The popular DJ is leaving for 'family and new adventures'
Arts and Entertainment
arts + ents
Arts and Entertainment
Public Service Broadcasting are going it alone
music
Arts and Entertainment
Eddie Redmayne as transgender artist Lili Elbe in The Danish Girl
filmFirst look at Oscar winner as transgender artist
Arts and Entertainment
Season three of 'House of Cards' will be returning later this month
TV reviewHouse of Cards returns to Netflix
Arts and Entertainment
Harrison Ford will play Rick Deckard once again for the Blade Runner sequel
film review
Arts and Entertainment
The modern Thunderbirds: L-R, Scott, Virgil, Alan, Gordon and John in front of their home, the exotic Tracy Island
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Natural beauty: Aidan Turner stars in the new series of Poldark
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Taylor Swift won Best International Solo Female (Getty)

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Shining star: Maika Monroe, with Jake Weary, in ‘It Follows’
film review
Arts and Entertainment

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Paloma Faith arrives at the Brit Awards (Getty)

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Anne Boleyn's beheading in BBC Two's Wolf Hall

TV review
Arts and Entertainment
Follow every rainbow: Julie Andrews in 'The Sound of Music'
film Elizabeth Von Trapp reveals why the musical is so timeless
Arts and Entertainment
Bytes, camera, action: Leehom Wang in ‘Blackhat’
film
Arts and Entertainment
The Libertines will headline this year's festival
music
Arts and Entertainment
Richard Dean Anderson in the original TV series, which ran for seven seasons from 1985-1992
tv
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

    Homeless Veterans campaign

    Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
    Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

    Lost without a trace

    But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
    Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

    Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

    Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
    International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

    Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

    Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
    Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

    Confessions of a planespotter

    With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
    Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

    Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

    Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
    Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

    Russia's gulag museum

    Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
    The big fresh food con: Alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay

    The big fresh food con

    Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
    Virginia Ironside was my landlady: What is it like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7?

    Virginia Ironside was my landlady

    Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
    8 best workout DVDs

    8 best workout DVDs

    If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
    War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

    Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

    Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable
    Living with Alzheimer's: What is it really like to be diagnosed with early-onset dementia?

    What is it like to live with Alzheimer's?

    Depicting early-onset Alzheimer's, the film 'Still Alice' had a profound effect on Joy Watson, who lives with the illness. She tells Kate Hilpern how she's coped with the diagnosis
    The Internet of Things: Meet the British salesman who gave real-world items a virtual life

    Setting in motion the Internet of Things

    British salesman Kevin Ashton gave real-world items a virtual life
    Election 2015: Latest polling reveals Tories and Labour on course to win the same number of seats - with the SNP holding the balance of power

    Election 2015: A dead heat between Mr Bean and Dick Dastardly!

    Lord Ashcroft reveals latest polling – and which character voters associate with each leader
    Audiences queue up for 'true stories told live' as cult competition The Moth goes global

    Cult competition The Moth goes global

    The non-profit 'slam storytelling' competition was founded in 1997 by the novelist George Dawes Green and has seen Malcolm Gladwell, Salman Rushdie and Molly Ringwald all take their turn at the mic