HAIR TODAY ... WHAT THREE HIPPIES DID NEXT

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The Independent Culture
JON SNOW

According to the tele-vision newsreader - who in 1970 led a sit-in at Liverpool University's senate building - "everyone at the time was a protester. Revolution was in the air." He and a group of some 300 students were protesting against the university's links with firms connected to South Africa and to chemical research. As a result, he was suspended for a year for "forcibly preventing a senior administrative officer of the university from reaching his office". By the time his suspension was up, he had already found a job in television. Three decades on, the Channel 4 anchorman's rebellious attitude is confined mainly to his challenging choice of neckwear.

MARSHA HUNT

The face of the musical Hair and the inspiration for the Rolling Stones song "Brown Sugar", this American singer, model and actress was the ultimate hippy chick. Legend has it that Mick Jagger cheated on Marianne Faithfull to be with her. He fathered her daughter, Karis. Hunt began writing, and is now an acclaimed novelist, giving the lie to her previous wild-child image.

MAX TAYLOR

"A bit of pre-career-building perambulation" is how Taylor - now the chairman of Lloyd's of London - describes his brief association with the heady world of the music business. After dropping out of Southampton University, where he was studying electronic engineering, he joined a company that managed rock bands - among them Hawkwind, whose spaced-out stage shows featured a buxom topless dancer. As Hawkwind went on to chart success with "Silver Machine", Taylor's career took a change in direction when he entered the world of City insurance broking. He was appointed to head Lloyd's in 1997, and now prefers not to talk about his rock'n'roll years.

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