It's hard to swallow how trivial American politics has become

CONTEMPLATING AMERICA this week has been like watching a gigantic edition of The Jerry Springer Show. But instead of the usual procession of dysfunctional representatives of the US underclass, falling over their own blubber and ponytails in an attempt to knock five kinds of theatrical crap out of each other, we have - up on stage (a big hand folks!) - Bill, Monica, Ken Starr, Hillary, Linda Tripp and as many others as can be conceivably subpoenaed.

Nor is the audience made up of the usual mischievous voyeurs, who enjoy nothing better than to yell "whoarrr!" in mock horror whenever a fight looks likely. No, this special show is being conducted entirely in front of a hand-picked audience of sober-suited media commentators, columnists, political journalists, presenters and editors. The strapline at the bottom of the screen reads, "They Had Sex. Or Did They?"

This event is (unlike the alleged sex itself) both salacious and exhausting. And clearly, for those in the audience, it is addictive. For what is truly remarkable about the Monica Lewinsky affair is how the American people themselves say "it isn't that important", and how most journalists seem to come up with ever more ingenious arguments for why it is, in fact, the biggest show in town. And why it should never, ever, end.

Certainly, there seems to be a wide agreement among pundits that Bill Clinton's rather pathetic address to the nation on Monday night could not represent the final stage of the drama. He had not been frank enough. Nor had the President, apparently, answered all of Ken Starr's detailed questions earlier about exactly what he and Miss Lewinsky had done.

This, you see, was important when establishing whether Mr Clinton had grounds for saying that what happened did not constitute a sexual relationship. He should, said the broadsheet press (both here and over there), have answered these questions candidly.

Really? Reading the gossipy Drudge Report on the Internet this morning, I came across this line: "The DRUDGE REPORT has learned that Monica Lewinsky, when asked by prosecutors if the president performed `cunnilingus' on her, responded by saying she did not know what the word `cunnilingus' meant." Perhaps Ken Starr asked Mr Clinton the same question. Or perhaps the independent counsel asked the President, in detail, about the suggestion that Bill had allowed Monica to fellate him for a while, and had then procured his own climax while the chubby intern danced a little Salome number on the Oval Office carpet.

It could be that their conversation turned to the propulsive qualities of the presidential semen, and its capacity for landing far away. Anyway, Mr Clinton refused to answer such queries, labelling them as "intrusive", whereas the conventional wisdom is that he should have replied candidly.

Let us not forget why all this semen and cunnilingus stuff is supposed to matter. In 1991, before he was elected, Mr Clinton probably (though he denies it) showed his willy to a woman called Paula Jones in a hotel bedroom. She did not want to see it, told him so, and he put it away again. Several years later she filed a case against him for sexual harassment, and subpoenaed everyone that might have had any carnal knowledge of him. Enter Linda Tripp bearing tapes, enter Monica Lewinsky, enter Clinton's evasion (or lie) to the Paula Jones grand jury.

Jones's case - a civil one - was dismissed, not because of Clinton's testimony, but because the allegation did not amount to harassment. But by now Ken Starr was on the case. If Clinton had fibbed then, he was a perjurer. If he had attempted to get Monica to fib, then he was suborner. So, despite the fact that the original case had come to nothing, despite the fact that the Monica relationship was (according to her) consensual, if Ken could show that there had been knobbing, then he had his man by the short and curlies.

A Martian, landing on earth at this point, might wonder at the sanity of the whole business. Indeed, an American landing in Washington might wonder the same thing. I am not going to go into the question of whether lying in court about your consensual sexual relationships constitutes perjury or not. If it does, then it's a perjury that many decent people would commit, and feel themselves entitled to commit. Most Americans know this, even if the press doesn't.

They also know that several good American presidents have strayed, some far more egregiously than Bill. And they no more expect to judge presidents by their lower body polkas, than they query the world-renowned surgeon who ogles the anaesthetist, or the skilled pilot with a girl in every airport. But, according to the press, they haven't truly understood.

In yesterday's Washington Post, for instance, the comment was universally unfavourable to Clinton. Columnist David Broder encapsulated the argument when he disputed Clinton's claim that it was nobody's business. "Would that it were so," intoned Broder, piously. "But he made it our business - the nation's burden - first by showing utter disrespect for the high office he holds, and second by refusing all this time to do what he alone could do: clear up the matter."

Broder even invoked a previous crisis. "He [Clinton] not only lied to Paula Jones's lawyers, he lied to the public and to his closest political associates, and implicated the leaders of his party and his government in the deception. In all those respects, Clinton's behaviour is truly Nixonian."

This is such staggering rubbish, that it makes one despair. Nixon engaged in a criminal conspiracy to burgle opponents, and to cover up the results. He and Kissinger also connived at the secret destruction of Cambodia, the overthrow of the democratically elected government of Chile, and the unnecessary bombing of North Vietnam. Other presidents waged secret war against Cuba, organised the military removal of the progressive and elected government of Guatemala (with the consequence of the deaths of many thousands of innocent people), fabricated the Gulf of Tonkin incident, and - latterly - permitted Contragate.

And this litany of presidential sins is supposed to be less serious than fibbing about muff-diving? Well, yes. At least one serious article in a major British broadsheet newspaper seemed to suggest yesterday that Clinton has showed himself to be unfit for the presidency, by reason of having sex with Monica Lewinsky yet "not reciprocating any affection or desire".

This is the excuse of the trivialiser everywhere, the alibi of the TV executive who cuts the current affairs programme, and brings in yet another "people show". Clinton's tortuous tergiversations have a parallel in those of the press, who have been happily complicit in this heroic trivialisation of politics. Forget the difficult, intractable problems, the ones where lives hang in the balance. Forget the Congo. Forget the environment. As the planet heats up, there's only one kind of emission control that they're interested in.

The issue, we're now told (having passed through fraud, perjury and cover- up), is "character". And so it is. Once the Soviet Union was dubbed "Upper Volta with missiles". Today the US is Oprah with nukes.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Chocolat author Joanne Harris has spoken about the financial struggles most authors face

books
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from How To Train Your Dragon 2

Review: Imaginative storytelling returns with vigour

film
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Josh Hutcherson, Donald Sutherland and Jena Malone in Mockinjay: Part 1

film
Arts and Entertainment

film
Arts and Entertainment
Characters in the new series are based on real people, say its creators, unlike Arya and Clegane the Dog in ‘Game of Thrones’
tv
Arts and Entertainment
A waxwork of Jane Austen has been unveiled at The Jane Austen Centre in Bath

books
Arts and Entertainment
Britney Spears has been caught singing without Auto-Tune

music
Arts and Entertainment
Unless films such as Guardians of the Galaxy, pictured, can buck the trend, this summer could be the first in 13 years that not a single Hollywood blockbuster takes $300m

tv
Arts and Entertainment
Miley Cyrus has her magic LSD brain stolen in this crazy video produced with The Flaming Lips

music
Arts and Entertainment
Gay icons: Sesame Street's Bert (right) and Ernie

tv
Arts and Entertainment
Singer Robin Thicke and actress Paula Patton

music
Arts and Entertainment
The new film will be shot in the same studios as the Harry Potter films

books
Arts and Entertainment
Duncan Bannatyne left school at 15 and was still penniless at 29

Bannatyne leaves Dragon's Den

TV
Arts and Entertainment
The French economist Thomas Piketty wrote that global inequality has worsened

books
Arts and Entertainment
David Tennant and Benedict Cumberbatch

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Affleck plays a despondent Nick Dunne in David Fincher's 'Gone Girl'

film
Arts and Entertainment
Pete Doherty (L) and Carl Barât look at the scene as people begin to be crushed

music
Arts and Entertainment

tv
Arts and Entertainment
Pete Doherty and Caral Barat of The Libertines performs on stage at British Summer Time Festival at Hyde Park

music
Arts and Entertainment
Ariana Grande and Iggy Azalea perform on stage at the Billboard Music Awards 2014

music
Arts and Entertainment

theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Zina Saro-Wiwa

art
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

    A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

    Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
    Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

    Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

    In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
    Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

    A writer spends a night on the streets

    Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
    Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

    UK's railways are entering a new golden age

    New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
    Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

    Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

    Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
    Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

    Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

    This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
    Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

    Why did we stop eating whelks?

    Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
    10 best women's sunglasses

    In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

    From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
    Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

    World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

    No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
    Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

    Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

    18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
    The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

    The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

    A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
    A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

    A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

    The German people demand an end to the fighting
    New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

    New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

    For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
    Can scientists save the world's sea life from

    Can scientists save our sea life?

    By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
    Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

    Richard III review

    Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice