Spaghetti metal gets Stigmatised

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

Italian deathcore band Stigma on starting from the bottom and coming up fighting...childhood

The story’s a simple one and destined to be repeated the world over until companies stop building drums and guitars or at least stop selling them to disgruntled teenagers: a band is formed by school friends and, as a decade passes, that band shifts from extra-curricular diversion to potential meal ticket. As triumphs over adversity go, Stigma’s isn’t the most harrowing David and Goliath tale you could hope to hear. There are no deaths, no tragedies, no twisted tales of inner turmoil, just a band overcoming small town sleepiness and home-grown apathy towards the band’s grisly take on ‘deathcore’ that’s seen them secure enviable label deals, sponsorship packages and festival slots and take their place in a brutal – if somehow tuneful – musical pandemic.

“Coming from Italy and playing this type of music isn’t easy,” states talkative frontman Stefano ‘Vlad’ Ghersi. “There are some great bands but you can’t say there’s a real ‘scene’ here. The kids always go to see shows when bands from other countries come to play, but the Italian bands aren’t supported as much. ”While this might sound like a simple enough case of sour grapes from a musician feeling his band is not getting the attention it deserves, Ghersi’s candour and lack of bitterness suggests a far simpler alternative: it’s just the way things happen to be. Whether it involves driving the breadth of Italy to play one song at three in the morning before the police intervene or having a gig cancelled because the 13-year-old promoter has been grounded for getting a bad report card, the frontman is at least philosophical when it comes to the various trials and tribulations Stigma have faced as they’ve worked to up their profile. “It’s strange for sure,” he says, “but it’s good because you come up from the very bottom and you know that outside of Italy things are better at least.”

In today’s modern age, of course, any given scene isn’t necessarily thwarted by geographical boundaries and tough local crowds. A few simple mouseclicks will give you a deathcore world tour from Manchester to Melbourne, proving that this particular musical hybrid has gone well and truly global, spreading streaked mascara, wayward facial hair and gaudy neck tattoos like a zombie virus while selling bucketloads of records commercial radio wouldn’t touch with a bargepole. Indeed, Stigma’s sophomore full-length, the Tales From The Crypt-inspired ‘Concerto For The Undead’, is a microcosmic example of the genre’s worldwide appeal, having drawn in UK-based producer Jona Weinhofen to twiddle knobs and guests from as far away as Chicago and Australia while the album itself has been released by one label in Europe and another each in Australia and Japan. When put to him like this, the otherwise amiable frontman is thoughtful if perhaps less than enthused. “We’re kind’ve unlucky, because we tried to mix these genres way before ‘deathcore’ became a trend,” he states with just the barest twinge of regret. “Because we weren’t already touring outside of Italy we look like a brand new band, and to most people it might be ‘look at those shady Italians, trying to emulate Unearth and the Black Dahlia Murder.’” While this last comment at least raises a chuckle, Ghersi is fully aware of the inherent perils in playing such a popular style. “There are a few bands that are really good and trying to evolve from release to release, and then there are 5000 others who are just copying and pasting whatever everyone else is doing. I actually think it’s a trend that is going to finish soon, but this is the kind of music we love and we’ll keep on playing it.” Tough words but honest ones at least, and the moral of the story? Long live the death of deathcore!

New album, Concerto For The Undead, released by Pivotal Rockordings is out now and available for digital download and on CD. Check out their MySpace .

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Nick Dunne, played by Ben Affleck, finds himself at the centre of a media storm when his wife is reported missing and assumed dead

film
Arts and Entertainment
Lindsay Lohan made her West End debut earlier this week in 'Speed-the-Plow'

theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Artist Nathan Sawaya stands with his sculpture 'Yellow' at the Art of Brick Exhibition

art
Arts and Entertainment
'Strictly Come Dancing' attracted 6.53 million viewers on Friday
tv
Arts and Entertainment
David Tennant plays Detective Emmett Carver in the US version on Broadchurch

tv
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor goes undercover at Coal Hill School in 'The Caretaker'
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Ni , Rock of Rah, Vanuatu: The Ni live on one of the smallest islands of Vanuatu; Nelson flew five hours from Sydney to capture the 'isolation forged by their remoteness'
photographyJimmy Nelson travelled the world to photograph 35 threatened tribes in an unashamedly glamorous style
Arts and Entertainment
David Byrne
musicDavid Byrne describes how the notorious First Lady's high life dazzled him out of a career low
Arts and Entertainment
Sergeant pfeffer: Beatles in 1963
booksA song-by-song survey of the Beatles’ lyrics
Arts and Entertainment
music'I didn't even know who I was'
Arts and Entertainment
Cheryl was left in a conundrum with too much talent and too few seats during the six-chair challenge stage
tvReview: It was tension central at boot camp as the ex-Girls Aloud singer whittled down the hopefuls
Arts and Entertainment
Kalen Hollomon's Anna Wintour collage

art
Arts and Entertainment

TV Grace Dent on TV
Arts and Entertainment

Music
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black

music
Arts and Entertainment
Natalie Dormer is believed to be playing a zombie wife in Patient Zero

film
Arts and Entertainment
Mark Gatiss says Benedict Cumberbatch oozes sex appeal with his 'Byronic looks' and Sherlock coat
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Clothing items bearing the badge have become popular among music aficionados
musicAuthorities rule 'clenched fist' logo cannot be copyrighted
Arts and Entertainment
Liam Neeson will star in Seth MacFarlane's highly-anticipated Ted 2

film
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike in 'Gone Girl'

film
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Pride: Are censors pandering to homophobia?

    Are censors pandering to homophobia?

    US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence
    Hong Kong protests: A good time to open a new restaurant?

    A good time to open a new restaurant in Hong Kong?

    As pro-democracy demonstrators hold firm, chef Rowley Leigh, who's in the city to open a new restaurant, says you couldn't hope to meet a nicer bunch
    Isis is an hour from Baghdad, the Iraq army has little chance against it, and air strikes won't help

    Isis an hour away from Baghdad -

    and with no sign of Iraq army being able to make a successful counter-attack
    Turner Prize 2014 is frustratingly timid

    Turner Prize 2014 is frustratingly timid

    The exhibition nods to rich and potentially brilliant ideas, but steps back
    Last chance to see: Half the world’s animals have disappeared over the last 40 years

    Last chance to see...

    The Earth’s animal wildlife population has halved in 40 years
    So here's why teenagers are always grumpy - and it's not what you think

    Truth behind teens' grumpiness

    Early school hours mess with their biological clocks
    Why can no one stop hackers putting celebrities' private photos online?

    Hacked photos: the third wave

    Why can no one stop hackers putting celebrities' private photos online?
    Royal Ballet star dubbed 'Charlize Theron in pointe shoes' takes on Manon

    Homegrown ballerina is on the rise

    Royal Ballet star Melissa Hamilton is about to tackle the role of Manon
    Education, eduction, education? Our growing fascination with what really goes on in school

    Education, education, education

    TV documentaries filmed in classrooms are now a genre in their own right
    It’s reasonable to negotiate with the likes of Isis, so why don’t we do it and save lives?

    It’s perfectly reasonable to negotiate with villains like Isis

    So why don’t we do it and save some lives?
    This man just ran a marathon in under 2 hours 3 minutes. Is a 2-hour race in sight?

    Is a sub-2-hour race now within sight?

    Dennis Kimetto breaks marathon record
    We shall not be moved, say Stratford's single parents fighting eviction

    Inside the E15 'occupation'

    We shall not be moved, say Stratford single parents
    Air strikes alone will fail to stop Isis

    Air strikes alone will fail to stop Isis

    Talks between all touched by the crisis in Syria and Iraq can achieve as much as the Tornadoes, says Patrick Cockburn
    Nadhim Zahawi: From a refugee on welfare to the heart of No 10

    Nadhim Zahawi: From a refugee on welfare to the heart of No 10

    The Tory MP speaks for the first time about the devastating effect of his father's bankruptcy