Chris Martin gives Radio 4 interviewer the cold shoulder

Chris Martin has long been known as a reluctant rock star, a man who prefers a quiet life of yoga practice and vegetarian dinners at home rather than a red carpet lifestyle.

Yesterday, the Coldplay frontman further consolidated his reputation as the quiet man of pop, by walking out of an interview for a Radio 4 arts programme, Front Row, saying he didn't like "having to talk about things".

The musician, 31, abandoned the interview to promote Coldplay's new album nine minutes into the recording, telling the programme's presenter, John Wilson, that he was "not really enjoying this".

The album, Viva la Vida (or Death to All his Friends), which was released on Thursday, is set to become one of the fastest – and biggest-selling records in chart history. After selling 125,000 copies in its first day, it could see Coldplay outsell their 2005 album X&Y, which sold 465,000 in its first week.

The new album is almost certain to take the top spot in the album chart on Sunday. The group are EMI's best-selling act and the latest album is said to be crucial for the record company, which is attempting to revive its fortunes with more people downloading music illegally.

A BBC report said Martin appeared uncomfortable from the start of the interview. Asked about a speech he made at a music awards ceremony in 2005 when he said the band would be away "for a very long time", Martin said: "I always say stupid things and I think Radio 4 is the place that will most remind me of that."

When Wilson asked whether the album's full title reflected the band's obsession with death, it was received with some hostility by Martin, who accused Wilson of being manipulative.

"I wouldn't agree with you there at all, no. I'd say you're intentionally twisting me into saying something I don't really mean," he said.

Martin then appeared to hesitate after Wilson asked him about the inspiration for lyrics of a song dealing with the subject of a deposed dictator.

When Wilson asked that Martin move closer to the microphone, the musician asked: "Can I have two minutes – is that all right?" before walking out.

Wilson asked him whether he was feeling under pressure, to which Martin said: "No, no ... yes, I just don't like to talk about things."

Wilson turned to Coldplay's drummer, Will Champion, asking: "Have I upset him?" Champion replied: "I don't think so."

Champion continued with the interview until Martin came back into the studio to answer a final question about whether he was attempting to find new musical territory with the album. Martin answered simply: "Um, yes, yes, yes ... exactly."

It is not the first time thatMartin has shown a strong aversion to media attention, having previously scuffled with photographers in London and New York.

Famous walkouts

* The former Conservative MP John Nott walked out of an interview with the late Robin Day at a Tory party conference in October 1982, after he was called a "here-today, gone tomorrow politician". Reflecting on it years later, Nott called it a "rather silly interview".

* The Bee Gees singer Barry Gibb walked off The Clive Anderson Show in 1996 after a verbal sparring match during which Gibb remarked: "We used to be called Les Tossers" and Anderson replied: "You'll always be Les Tossers to me."

*Nicolas Sarkozy abruptly unplugged his microphone during an interview with the American television network CBS in October 2007 saying he was "very busy, very busy". Recording the programme 60 Minutes, the French President said: "I don't have time. I have a big job to do." After being persuaded to return to the set, he cut short the conversation when he was asked about his estranged wife Cécilia.

*Tom Cruise walked out of an interview with the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet Söndag, after the conversation turned to his ex-wife, Nicole Kidman. A reporter mentioned Kidman and the two children that she and Cruise adopted. "Now you've gone over the line," Cruise said, adding: "Now, unfortunately, I have to end this."

*S Club 7 walked out of a BBC 3 interview in 2003 after being asked about the discrepancy between what the group earned and what they were paid.

Arts and Entertainment

Great British Bake Off
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

    Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

    But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
    Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

    Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

    Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
    Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

    Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

    Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
    Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

    Britain's 24-hour culture

    With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
    Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

    The addictive nature of Diplomacy

    Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
    Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

    Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

    Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
    8 best children's clocks

    Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

    Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
    Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

    Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

    After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
    Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

    How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

    Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
    Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

    'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

    In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
    Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

    The Arab Spring reversed

    Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
    King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

    Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

    Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
    Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

    Who is Oliver Bonas?

    It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
    Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

    Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

    However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
    60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

    60 years of Scalextric

    Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones