Ed Sheeran enjoys streaming success after Glastonbury set ahead of new chart

Metallica and Dolly Parton have also seen their streams rise after their sets

Click to follow
The Independent Culture

Ed Sheeran’s songs have rocketed in popularity on streaming services after his lauded set at last weekend’s Glastonbury Festival.

The British singer-songwriter played the Pyramid Stage on Sunday evening before enjoying a massive 195 per cent rise in streams during the following 24 hours.

Sheeran’s latest hit “Sing” is en route to become the most-streamed track of the week with early data showing that 13 per cent of its chart contribution has come from streams since the weekend so far.

Dolly Parton and Metallica have also seen a boost since their Glastonbury performances. “Jolene” has climbed 116 places in the chart and is on course to reach number 40, while the heavy metal band’s classic “Enter Sandman” is on track for number 43.

Metallica’s streams have increased by 165 per cent while fellow headliners Arcade Fire grew theirs by 148 per cent.

Parton’s are up 95 per cent since her Glastonbury debut, which saw her hailed as the biggest attraction since The Rolling Stones last summer.

The “9 to 5” singer was forced to deny that she mimed during her performance after viewers took to Twitter to debate her set.

 

This weekend’s chart will combine audio streams from services such as Spotify and Deezer with paid-for downloads for the first time. Video views on YouTube and Vevo will not count.

Streaming has soared in popularity in the UK, with “Rather Be” by Clean Bandit and “Waves” by Mr Probz each passing 1.5 million weekly streams at their peak compared to around 100,000 download sales.

From this week, 100 streams are counting as equivalent to one download or physical single in the chart compilation process. The definition of a stream to qualify will be 30 seconds of listening, after which royalties are paid.

The new chart will reflect the country's most popular songs rather than those most widely boght.

Comments