McCartney gets a frog in his throat again

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The Independent Culture

Sir Paul McCartney, whose Frog Chorus single has been widely derided as the lowest point in his song-writing career, is to re-release the track after 20 years.

Sir Paul McCartney, whose Frog Chorus single has been widely derided as the lowest point in his song-writing career, is to re-release the track after 20 years.

The song, with its instantly recognisable "bom bom bom" refrain, is being issued after he struck a deal with movie mogul Harvey Weinstein to release a collection of three animations on DVD which the ex-Beatle masterminded.

The track, officially called "We All Stand Together" and credited to Paul McCartney and The Frog Chorus, was originally written for the film Rupert and the Frog Song. Sir Paul had long been a fan of the cartoon bear.

Although the Frog Chorus single was a major chart hit, reaching number three in 1984, it has not fared well since. New Musical Express placed it in the top 10 worst singles of all time, and a Channel 4 poll last year to find the 100 most-hated songs ranked it 63rd, Sir Paul's highest entry.

It will be released next month to mark the song's 20th anniversary, coupled with a new song for children called "Tropical Island Hum", the title track to a short film on his DVD, Paul McCartney: The Music and Animation Collection. Sir Paul, who played Glastonbury Festival last month, said: "I don't often write songs for children but we made this new film for kids and the film needed a song. As a songwriter I'm always interested in trying to write music in different styles, so I took the challenge of trying to write another one for kids.

"I shouldn't imagine too many of the Glastonbury bands would follow performing "Helter Skelter" there with releasing a single for children ... but it's ringing the changes like this which keeps me interested in the possibilities of life."

Gareth Grundy, deputy editor of Q magazine, said: "While 'We All Stand Together' is a bit silly and hardly up there with 'Hey Jude' or 'Eleanor Rigby', it has its place. Let's face it, it remains suitable for children of all ages. So I was a bit disappointed he didn't play it at Glastonbury."



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