Peter, aged 12, is youngest Young Musician of the Year

He is not even in his teens and is dwarfed by his instrument – but Peter Moore is already a musical star.

The 12 year-old trombonist last night added another remarkable chapter to his budding music career after becoming the youngest-ever winner of the BBC's Young Musician of the Year award.

Peter, from Stalybridge, Greater Manchester, triumphed over four other finalists from percussion, keyboard, strings and woodwind sections to take the prestigious prize.

The Belfast-born musician's record-breaking performance meant he claimed the youngest winner's mantle from Jennifer Pike, who was also 12 when she won in 2002, by just six weeks. And not even an 8-1 thrashing by Middlesbrough to his beloved Manchester City earlier could dampen his euphoria – nor the thought of heading back to school today.

"It's not sunk in at all. It probably won't until next week," the aspiring concert performer said last night after receiving a standing ovation at the Wales Millennium Centre, in Cardiff.

"I couldn't believe it when they read my name out and it all seemed to happen so quickly. It feels so good to join all the big names that have won before and think of how prestigious it is.

"To be the youngest winner is just amazing. But I don't think age really matters in a competition like this."

His family background possibly reveals the secret of his outstanding achievements. His parents, Jane and Grenville, both 46, are music teachers and play the French Horn, while his 18- year-old twin siblings also play instruments – brother, David, the flugelhorn and sister, Helen, the tenor horn.

Peter, who started playing trombones when he was seven, was almost not entered into the competition after his mother filled in the form wrongly and had to make a mad dash to the local supermarket to buy a bottle of correction fluid. But, on winning, he urged more young people to get into classical music.

"I think more young people should get into classical music, as it's a good way of educating you about music," said Peter, who also enjoys tennis and doing magic tricks. "In the future, I'd love to give concerts and entertain people, because I just enjoy playing so much."

The third-year student at Manchester's Chetham's School of Music performed Tomasi's Trombone Concerto during course of the weekend and a contemporary piece, Sang till Lotta, by Swedish composer Jan Sandstrom. It was his first time playing in front of a full orchestra.

"Playing with the National Orchestra of Wales was brilliant," he said.

"This has been such a great venue to play in. The audience have been really nice and friendly."

His win caps an extraordinary, and short, musical career. He started playing the baritone horn at the age of five before progressing to the trombone two years' later.

His talent came to the fore and he was later crowned primary school musician of the year in Northern Ireland, where he lived until he was eight.

Passing his Grade 8 trombone exam with distinction at the age of 10, he has been Principal Trombone of the National Children's Band of Great Britain for the past three years.

His proud mother last night said she was delighted with his win but warned the youngster that celebrations were unlikely to get too rowdy or go on too late.

"He's still got to go to school in the morning," she said. "Peter really deserves this. He was fantastic. He just loves playing, and wants to do it in as many places as possible. He's been excited about the contest all week."

The other four finalists were Sheffield-born Jadran Duncumb, 18, on the guitar; flautist David Smith, an 18-year old from Fife; 17-year-old Jim Molyneux, a percussionist from Littleborough; and Ipswich student Erdem Misirlioglu, an 18-year-old pianist. It was the first time it was an all-male event.

The competition's judges included former royal harpist Catrin Finch, 27, and violinist Nicola Benedetti, 21, who also won the competition in 2004 and was this week named best young British classical performer at the Classical Brit Awards.

The other finalists

Sheffield-born Jadran Duncumb, 18, guitar.

The teenager currently lives in Ski, Norway. He has won the Norwegian National Youth Competition twice and starts at the Royal College of Music, London, this autumn.

David Smith, 18, from Edinburgh, flute.

A student from the Scottish capital's St Mary's Music School, the accomplished saxophonist is also a member of the Edinburgh Youth Orchestra and the National Youth Orchestra of Scotland.

Erdem Misirlioglu, 18, from Ipswich, piano.

The 'A level' student at Ipswich's, Suffolk, travels every week to the Junior Department at Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London to train on a Saturday. Northgate High School

Jim Molyneux, 17, percussion.

The teenager from Littleborough was the second finalist who studies at Manchester's Chetham's School of Music behind winner Peter. The Lancashire teenager also plays in bands in a wide-range of areas including classical, folk and rock.

Source: BBC.

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