Album: Ol' Dirty Bastard

Osirus, SURE SHOT
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Ol' Dirty Bastard's third and presumably final album (though rappers do seem to have a habit of continuing their careers from well beyond the grave) doesn't really add much to our knowledge of this most colourful of hip-hop legends. As usual, Dirty's preferred subject matter is himself: I lost count of the number of times he uses the third-person "Dirty", or "Dirt". There's Dirty telling us about his crack-dealing days ("Pop Shots"); Dirty asserting his own lyrical potency ("Who Can Make It Happen Like Dirt?"); Dirty boasting of his promiscuous habit of "filling 'em with Dirty long" ("Pussy Keep Calling" and the back-door man anthem "Dirty Run"); Dirty appraising his status as a "Wu Tang veteran, straight from lockdown" ("Stand up"), and Dirty celebrating his popularity in, appropriately enough, the Dirty South ("Down South"). There's even a track just called simply "Dirty Dirty", although the most poignant reference is probably that which appears in "Caked up", when he asserts: "I'm not gonna stop ti

Ol' Dirty Bastard's third and presumably final album (though rappers do seem to have a habit of continuing their careers from well beyond the grave) doesn't really add much to our knowledge of this most colourful of hip-hop legends. As usual, Dirty's preferred subject matter is himself: I lost count of the number of times he uses the third-person "Dirty", or "Dirt". There's Dirty telling us about his crack-dealing days ("Pop Shots"); Dirty asserting his own lyrical potency ("Who Can Make It Happen Like Dirt?"); Dirty boasting of his promiscuous habit of "filling 'em with Dirty long" ("Pussy Keep Calling" and the back-door man anthem "Dirty Run"); Dirty appraising his status as a "Wu Tang veteran, straight from lockdown" ("Stand up"), and Dirty celebrating his popularity in, appropriately enough, the Dirty South ("Down South"). There's even a track just called simply "Dirty Dirty", although the most poignant reference is probably that which appears in "Caked up", when he asserts: "I'm not gonna stop till I'm under the dirt." But while his gun threats here are as graceless, brutal and downright tedious as any in hip hop, his way with humorous hyperbolic insult remained undimmed till the last, judging by lines such as: "You can eat my ass and have a Coke with that."

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