Album: Sam Prekop

Who's Your New Professor, THRILL JOCKEY
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The Independent Culture

One reviewer has used the term "warm lethargy" to describe Sam Prekop's musical manner, which just about nails the Sea And Cake front man's particular brand of post-rock. It is less studied and methodical than Tortoise (whose John McEntire played percussion and synths and mixed the album). There's a lightness and charm to Prekop's better moments that recalls the solo work of his former associate, Jim O'Rourke. This is best realised here in the opening "Something", a lovely, soothing piece in which delicate guitar arpeggios circle above jazzy, gently scudding drums (by Chicago Underground Duo's Chad Taylor), which eschew force and volume for a subtle bed of hi-hat and snare. It's topped off with an equally restrained cornet break by CUD's Rob Mazurek, and it's only when the track finishes that you realise Prekop has been singing, too: so soft and undemonstrative is his voice that, despite double-tracking, it's hard to make out what he's on about. It's probably best not to try, but simply to luxuriate i

One reviewer has used the term "warm lethargy" to describe Sam Prekop's musical manner, which just about nails the Sea And Cake front man's particular brand of post-rock. It is less studied and methodical than Tortoise (whose John McEntire played percussion and synths and mixed the album). There's a lightness and charm to Prekop's better moments that recalls the solo work of his former associate, Jim O'Rourke. This is best realised here in the opening "Something", a lovely, soothing piece in which delicate guitar arpeggios circle above jazzy, gently scudding drums (by Chicago Underground Duo's Chad Taylor), which eschew force and volume for a subtle bed of hi-hat and snare. It's topped off with an equally restrained cornet break by CUD's Rob Mazurek, and it's only when the track finishes that you realise Prekop has been singing, too: so soft and undemonstrative is his voice that, despite double-tracking, it's hard to make out what he's on about. It's probably best not to try, but simply to luxuriate in the Tropicalismo feel of the music. Prekop's favouring of unorthodox lyric structures cuts what might otherwise be genuine pop songs into odd shapes; but holding everything together is the superb rhythm section of Taylor and Josh Abrams, over which Prekop and Archer Prewitt inscribe elegant, serpentine guitar lines.

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