Album: Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings

Naturally, DAPTONE
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The Independent Culture

Those seeking more from their soul music than the deracinated clichés, witless hip-hop collaborators and endless credit-lists afforded by "urban" albums are hereby directed to this storming set from Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, a multi-racial eight-piece outfit well-schooled in the gamut of soul and funk styles. Jones, a Georgia peach who followed the familiar route from gospel to soul, doing back-up vocal work in the 1970s before being becalmed by the synthetic methods of the 1980s, has an easy command of her art, delivering "You're Gonna Get It" with the ambivalent promise of Barbara Lynn's "You'll Lose a Good Thing", and the Woody Guthrie standard "This Land is Your Land" in the manner of "It's a Man's Man's Man's World". The Dap-Kings are equally at home on the Stax-style Memphis grooves of "Your Thing is a Drag" and "Fish in the Dish", the JBs-esque funk riffing of "My Man Is a Mean Man", and the fluid Little Beaver/ "Clean Up Woman" guitar licks of "Natural Born Lover". Even more impre

Those seeking more from their soul music than the deracinated clichés, witless hip-hop collaborators and endless credit-lists afforded by "urban" albums are hereby directed to this storming set from Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, a multi-racial eight-piece outfit well-schooled in the gamut of soul and funk styles. Jones, a Georgia peach who followed the familiar route from gospel to soul, doing back-up vocal work in the 1970s before being becalmed by the synthetic methods of the 1980s, has an easy command of her art, delivering "You're Gonna Get It" with the ambivalent promise of Barbara Lynn's "You'll Lose a Good Thing", and the Woody Guthrie standard "This Land is Your Land" in the manner of "It's a Man's Man's Man's World". The Dap-Kings are equally at home on the Stax-style Memphis grooves of "Your Thing is a Drag" and "Fish in the Dish", the JBs-esque funk riffing of "My Man Is a Mean Man", and the fluid Little Beaver/ "Clean Up Woman" guitar licks of "Natural Born Lover". Even more impressive is the way they mix styles - as if that were Little Beaver with The Meters on "How Long Do I Have to Wait for You?", or both of them jamming with Fela Kuti's horn section and some North African desert-blues guitarists on "How Do I Let a Good Man Down?".

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