Album: The White Stripes

Get Behind Me Satan, XL
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The Independent Culture

Get Behind Me Satan represents the most significant change so far in the Stripes' career, featuring a mere three songs driven by Jack White's electric guitar licks. Instead, piano and acoustic guitar dominate, while the duo's palette is broadened by mandolin, marimba, glockenspiel and hand percussion - shakers, tambourine, bongos and the like. The most noticeable result is that there's no obvious monster-truck-sized riff to pull the album along - the closest they get is the single "Blue Orchid", on which Jack's buzzsaw guitar is accompanied by his creepy falsetto crooning. But it's a much more varied collection, ranging from the heavy blues trudges of "Red Rain" and "Instinct Blues" to the piano-driven relationship dance number "The Denial Twist" and the mandolin and tambourine of "Little Ghost", which is like some nursery rhyme in the manner of an old revivalist song. Elsewhere, "Passive Manipulation" is a brief anti-incest number sung by Meg ("Women, listen to your mothers/ Don't succumb to the wish

Get Behind Me Satan represents the most significant change so far in the Stripes' career, featuring a mere three songs driven by Jack White's electric guitar licks. Instead, piano and acoustic guitar dominate, while the duo's palette is broadened by mandolin, marimba, glockenspiel and hand percussion - shakers, tambourine, bongos and the like. The most noticeable result is that there's no obvious monster-truck-sized riff to pull the album along - the closest they get is the single "Blue Orchid", on which Jack's buzzsaw guitar is accompanied by his creepy falsetto crooning. But it's a much more varied collection, ranging from the heavy blues trudges of "Red Rain" and "Instinct Blues" to the piano-driven relationship dance number "The Denial Twist" and the mandolin and tambourine of "Little Ghost", which is like some nursery rhyme in the manner of an old revivalist song. Elsewhere, "Passive Manipulation" is a brief anti-incest number sung by Meg ("Women, listen to your mothers/ Don't succumb to the wishes of your brothers"), while "The Nurse" is the weirdest thing they've done, with clunking marimba punctuated by fierce flurries of drums. The best track is "Forever For Her (Is Over For Me)", on which Jack's Jagger-esque inflection and the blend of piano, marimba and shaker recall the Stones' more soulful moments.

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