Black Eyed Peas, 02, London
Iggy and the Stooges, Hammersmith Apollo, London

Black Eyed Peas put on a polished show, but their all-consuming desire to push products – even Fergie's new perfume – takes off some of the shine

Hard as it is to believe, there really was a time when Black Eyed Peas were just another hip-hop outfit, their popularity on a par with third-wave Daisy Agers such as Ghosts and backpacker rappers like Jurassic 5, happy to play to a modest constituency of stoners and students.

It took Justin Timberlake's patronage to change all that. In retrospect, the band's pacifist plea "Where Is the Love" (featuring a JT cameo) was a watershed, the last gasp of the groovy liberal BEP and the birth of the ruthless hit machine they've since become. From that global smash onwards, it's been all about Fergie, her humps, her lovely lady lumps and her boom boom pow.

In 2010, the Peas' consciousness has faded to black. For example, The End tour is sponsored by Bacardi, a company that props up the obscene blockade of Cuba. But hey, in for a dime, in for a dollar and morals be damned. One wonders whether there's anyone BEP would say no to, having hawked anything from Pepsi to BlackBerry. And if they aren't pimping other people's products, they're selling their own: on arrival, everyone's handed a sampler of Fergie's new perfume Outspoken, but I'm scared to find out what it smells like. (Yes, there may come a day when I can get through a Black Eyed Peas review without mentioning the incident when Fergie wet herself on stage, but it's some way off.)

As ruthless hit machines go, they're not bad at it. The Black Eyed Peas arena show has a fairly standard cyber-glitz aesthetic. The Transformer-like dancers who turn into metallic speaker boxes are pretty fly, the Spiderwoman/Mighty Morphin Power Ranger hybrids less so.

Each member gets a special moment in the spotlight. will.i.am plays a heart-shaped piano, pretend-DJs on a fake console for a ridiculously long time, and raps a freestyle based on tweets sent by the audience which ends at head-spinning velocity. Apl.De.Ap does backflips on the stage's penile promontory. Taboo rides a Tron bike over our heads.

Fergie gets a whole mini-gig to herself, and it has to be conceded that "Glamorous" is a gorgeous tune. Also, her pitch control, if it isn't autotune assisted, is impressive. More so than her bladder control, in any case.

Closing the show with all-consuming pop-rock monster "I've Got a Feeling" is a peculiar decision, given its lyrical promise "tonight's gonna be a good night". Then again, as Kierkegaard wrote, life can only be understood backwards but must be lived forwards. When Black Eyed Peas' career flashes before their eyes, they can finally answer the question "Where Is the Love?". They sold it.

Iggy Pop is nominally something of a cuddly figure now, but you'd never believe that after the Stooges have laid waste to Hammersmith with their 1973 classic Raw Power. It makes sense to bring Iggy and the Stooges' third album back to the city where, at the invitation of David Bowie, they recorded it in a studio at the foot of the Post Office Tower and where, only a few months earlier, they played their first concert outside the US in front of a crowd which included a 16-year-old Johnny Rotten and Mick Jones.

Before his belated 1980s hit "Real Wild One", the existence of Iggy Pop was just a rumour you heard from other kids with older brothers, and Raw Power never scraped the Top 100, but its influence reached the right people. It was on regular rotation in McLaren and Westwood's shop "Sex" during the germination of punk. Kurt Cobain named it his favourite album of all time. So did Johnny Marr.

Iggy's original cut was remixed by Bowie against Iggy's will, and the pair have bickered publicly ever since over whose is the superior version. A "Masters Edition" of Bowie's mix has just been released by Sony, but it's difficult to imagine what you possibly could do to Raw Power that wouldn't make it sound like a gang-fight inside a rusty trash can.

And, 37 years on, Osterberg's revelling in performing it. His hair is now silver by nature, but he retains that extraordinary musculature, a tangle of bungee cords and suspension bridge cables wrestling for supremacy underneath a leathery skin tarpaulin, as he prowls in that unmistakable gait.

He instigates a stage invasion for "Shake Appeal", only the third song. Two songs later, he's taking on the crowd on their turf, jeans slipping down to expose his pubic mound, builders' bumcrack and the first few inches of his famous penis.

In case you hadn't heard, the Stooges – James Williamson, Scott Asheton, Steve Mackay and Mike Watt of Minutement/fIREHOSE (recruited after the death of Ron Asheton in 2009) – are sounding fearsome right now. I've never seen pogoing at the back of the hall before.

It isn't long before they tear up the script and gleefully plunder the rest of the back-cat: "1970", "I Wanna Be Your Dog", "Cock in My Pocket", "I Got a Right" and proto-punk anthem "Kill City" ("We don't believe in anything/We don't stand for nothin' ...").

There's one moment that sums up everything. Steve Mackay's tooting some free jazz on the sax when, suddenly, Iggy kills it by thumping his mic into a speaker bin to force a screech of feedback. The Stooges in microcosm: high art destroyed by lowdown dirty kicks. Gimme danger? You got it.

Next Week:

Simon Price gets freaky with the Kiwi comic genius of Flight of the Conchords

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Pedro Pascal gives a weird look at the camera in the blooper reel

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Public vote: Art Everywhere poster in a bus shelter featuring John Hoyland
art
Arts and Entertainment
Peter Griffin holds forth in The Simpsons Family Guy crossover episode

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Judd Apatow’s make-it-up-as-you-go-along approach is ideal for comedies about stoners and slackers slouching towards adulthood
filmWith comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on
Arts and Entertainment
booksForget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Arts and Entertainment
Off set: Bab El Hara
tvTV series are being filmed outside the country, but the influence of the regime is still being felt
Arts and Entertainment
Red Bastard: Where self-realisation is delivered through monstrous clowning and audience interaction
comedy
Arts and Entertainment
O'Shaughnessy pictured at the Unicorn Theatre in London
tvFiona O'Shaughnessy explains where she ends and her strange and wonderful character begins
Arts and Entertainment
The new characters were announced yesterday at San Diego Comic Con

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Rhino Doodle by Jim Carter (Downton Abbey)

TV
Arts and Entertainment
No Devotion's Geoff Rickly and Stuart Richardson
musicReview: No Devotion, O2 Academy Islington, London
Arts and Entertainment
Christian Grey cradles Ana in the Fifty Shades of Grey film

film
Arts and Entertainment
Comedian 'Weird Al' Yankovic

Is the comedy album making a comeback?

comedy
Arts and Entertainment
While many films were released, few managed to match the success of James Bond blockbuster 'Skyfall'
film
Arts and Entertainment
Jamie Dornan as Christian Grey in the first-look Fifty Shades of Grey movie still

film
Arts and Entertainment
Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, centre, are up for Best Female TV Comic for their presenting quips on The Great British Bake Off

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in the TV adaptation of 'Fargo'

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Shakespeare in Love at the Noel Coward Theatre
theatreReview: Shakespeare in Love has moments of sheer stage poetry mixed with effervescent fun
Arts and Entertainment
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson stars in Hercules

film
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'

film
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

    The air strikes were tragically real

    The children were playing in the street with toy guns
    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

    Britain as others see us

    Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

    Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

    Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
    How did our legends really begin?

    How did our legends really begin?

    Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
    Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Lambrusco is back on the menu

    Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz
    A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

    A new Russian revolution

    Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
    Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

    The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
    Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

    Standing my ground

    If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

    Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
    Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

    Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

    The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
    The man who dared to go on holiday

    The man who dared to go on holiday

    New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

    Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

    For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
    The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

    The Guest List 2014

    Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
    Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

    Jokes on Hollywood

    With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on