Interpol at The Roundhouse, gig review: The shroud of gloom and misery is as endearing as ever

A touch of melodrama lifts angst-filled tracks like 'My Blue Supreme' into a rousing crescendo

Click to follow

Not particularly known for their energy on stage, indie-rock stalwarts Interpol are surprisingly buoyant in their first of two nights at The Roundhouse.

It's an efficient set, without the disparity seen when former bassist Carlos D used to hog the limelight.

Frontman Paul Banks is less dour than he used to be, even flashing the odd smile at the audience as the stage is flushed with jewel colours of ruby, sapphire, emerald and amber. Danny Kessler is positively hyper, hopping round the stage with his guitar and punctuating a chorus with licks of post-punk.

Banks cuts a beguiling figure, injecting a touch of melodrama to lift angst-filled tracks like 'My Blue Supreme' into a rousing crescendo. Sam Fogarino is relentless on the drums, knocking out a staccato rhythm that jolts the listener out of the trance-like state invited by the frontman’s dry monotone and obscure lyrics.

While the band return to their 2002 debut Turn On The Bright Lights, a good airing of tracks from 2014’s El Pintor suggests they are keen to prove their relevance. Closing the set with a ferocious rendition of 'Rage' and then a double encore for 'Untitled', Interpol’s shroud of gloom and misery is as endearing as ever.

You can listen to Interpol's music on our Spotify playlist

Comments