The Rough Guide to Choreography, Barbican Theatre London

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Having founded their own company, and recorded the process in their video diaries, the Ballet Boyz William Trevitt and Michael Nunn are on to their next challenge. The Channel 4 series The Rough Guide to Choreography shows them learning to make dances. The new work had its gala premiere at the Barbican, and will be shown on TV in the last episode of the series on Saturday.

Having founded their own company, and recorded the process in their video diaries, the Ballet Boyz William Trevitt and Michael Nunn are on to their next challenge. The Channel 4 series The Rough Guide to Choreography shows them learning to make dances. The new work had its gala premiere at the Barbican, and will be shown on TV in the last episode of the series on Saturday.

Trevitt and Nunn have always used the video diaries to draw audiences in - not just as television advertising, but by showing how their company works. They show the latest Rough Guide episode as an introduction to the new piece, and they're charming in it.

Still, it does leave you wondering about their priorities. They've asked the advice of star choreographers from William Forsythe to Gillian Lynne, consulted experts in capoeira and tai chi, discussed their concept and filmed rehearsals. The one thing they neglect is music.

Almost as an afterthought, Follow ends up with a scrunchy electronic soundtrack made by Nunn to fill in at rehearsals. It was added too late to give Trevitt any help with structure. Follow is made up of two duets, both attractive and both too long.

Right now, Trevitt is making good workshop choreography. You can see his influences: as a dancer, he's worked with Forsythe and Russell Maliphant, and Follow is full of hitched-sideways hips and winding arms.

But he presents his dancers well, and the second duet has some striking new shapes. Nunn and Monica Zamora slide around each other, never letting go. Lifted over his shoulder, she slithers coolly to the floor, holding her pose as she goes.

In the first duet, Hubert Essakow and Oxana Panchenko work their way around each other without touching. It gives them room to jump, to cover space. They're both fast dancers, and Panchenko moves with particular boldness. In this duet, though, Trevitt's steps are less distinctive.

Follow shares a bill with Maliphant's Torsion, which has become the Boyz' signature piece, and Christopher Wheeldon's Mesmerics. I wish Trevitt had picked up more from Wheeldon, who is musical choreographer. Mesmerics gets better the closer he works with his score. It's a Philip Glass compilation. Short sections of string quartets are followed by longer excerpts, which give Wheeldon more room to build dance structures. As you notice the patterns, he starts changing them, bringing in new steps.

On film, Gillian Lynne suggests that Nunn and Trevitt should mix dance and spoken word. Incomprehensibly, they respond by hiring Iestyn Edwards and his drag ballerina act. Edwards' panto routine serves to warm up the audience, but it seems to have wandered in from another, lazier show.

'The Rough Guide to Choreography' is on Channel 4 on Saturday, 7pm

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