On Air: This was the week that was

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The Independent Culture
Today On this day in 1969 Richmal Crompton died, in the middle of her last Just William story. She had lived long enough to see her delinquent creation turned into card games, jigsaws, "magic painting" books and a television series starring child actor Dennis Waterman.

Tomorrow In 1895 Henry James jotted down in his journal a tale heard at a dinner party, which became his novel The Turn of the Screw: this then begat Benjamin Britten's opera, as well as the film version with Deborah Kerr, below, (The Innocents) and Michael Winner's prequel (The Nightcomers, sometimes known as "The Turn of the Screwy").

In 1978 the executors of Lady Churchill admitted that two decades earlier she had burnt the Graham Sutherland portrait of Winston, even though Winnie had called it "a remarkable example of modern art".

Wednesday The first ever "outside broadcast" was made from the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, in 1910. Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci were picked up by five radio receivers nearby and also by several ships in New York Harbour, in one of which 250 guests strained their ears to catch the crackly high notes.

Thursday In 1938 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Walt Disney's first full-length Technicolor cartoon, premiered in the US. In London it later received a severe A certificate instead of a child-friendly U.

Friday The Russian Imperial Ballet gave Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty its first performance in 1890. The story was from Charles Perrault's 1697 Tales of Mother Goose.

Saturday One of the worst riots in theatre history was caused in 1769 when a conjuror, who had promised to squeeze himself into a quart bottle and "sing several songs", failed to turn up at the Haymarket.

Sunday Roger Ruskin Spear, painter and founder-member of the absolutely barking Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, died in 1990.

Konstantin Stanislavsky was born in 1863; his work inspired Lee Strasberg to devise the "Method" style of acting, which lives on in thespian exercises: Be a python, Marlon.

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