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Screening blue murder

Damien Hirst (anagram: Mr Thin Ideas) is a busy old chap. Not content with prowling nocturnally around pastures and sawing unsuspecting cows in half, not even content with directing Blur's video for "Country House" last year, the bloke's gone and made a film. Twenty minutes long, starring Keith Allen and Eddie Izzard, it's called Hanging Around, and boasts a soundtrack by Pulp, The Pogues, Joe Strummer and Alex James (the cool one from Blur who plays bass with his fringe in his eyes and an insouciant fag drooping from his lips). But that's not even the main attraction of Spellbound: Art and Film, which opened yesterday, 100 years to the day since the first screening of a film in Britain. The purpose of this mega culture-fest is to examine the passionate relationship that art and film have enjoyed throughout the century. Try some of these intriguing prospects: an exhibition of original storyboards, paintings and scripts for Ridley Scott's seminal sci-fi epics, Alien and Blade Runner; a dramatic installation by Peter Greenaway starring five real actors in a glass box; a phantasmagorical film set by Pop-Art genius Eduardo Paolozzi; Disney- inspired paintings by Paula Rego; and an interactive video installation by Terry Gilliam, based around his extraordinary film Brazil. Possibly the strangest concept of the lot comes in the shape of Douglas Gordon's 24 Hour Psycho (below). Gordon has decided to slow Hitchcock's classic down to the rate of three frames per second, so the director's craft in mise-en-scene and cutting is made nakedly evident. The title is erroneous, but 24 Hour Psycho's two special screenings still last a fundament-numbing 18 hours apiece. That's more like it. Why let cattle have all the fun? Let's suffer for art ourselves.

Hayward Gallery, London SE1 to 6 May (0171-960 4242)