SPORT ON TELEVISION

ON YOUR MARKS... WIN A PANASONIC TV FOR THE OLYMPICS
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The Independent Culture
In summer, the discerning punter's fancy turns to thoughts of sport. Not real sport - meat pies on the terraces, or five-hour traffic jams to Silverstone - but the much more sophisticated televised version. Sport on TV affords endless opportunities for smugness. Best-in-the-house seats for events like the Olympics can cost thousands of pounds; yet the best seat in the house is almost invariably the one in front of your television. And then there are the luxuries - fine wines and chocolates, consoling soap operas a finger-twitch away - and the stars: the saintly Sue Barker, trousers-on-fire Murray Walker, David Coleman and his heroic struggles with meaning, all held together by Des Lynam, unflappable as a concrete flag. This is the art of broadcasting at its most accomplished; only a philistine would miss it. But is your television up to it? In case it isn't, here's a chance to win a state- of-the-art television from Panasonic, official sponsors of the Olympic Games. Just answer the questions below, complete the tie-breaker, and send them on a postcard (with your name, address and daytime telephone number) to: Sunday Review / Panasonic Sport on TV Competition, Independent on Sunday, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London E14 5DL, to arrive by first post on Wednesday 17 July. We'll try to deliver the prizes in time for the Olympic opening ceremony.

1 Which Wimbledon commentator's catch-phrase was "Oooh, I say!"?

2 Which leading television commentator was formerly a top advertising executive?

3 Who said: "They think it's all over... It is now!"

Tie-breaker: say which currently competing sportsman or woman best epitomises the spirit of modern Britain - and why? (12 words or less)

The correct entry with the best tie-breaker will win a Panasonic TX- 14S2T 34cm colour television with Teletext and Contrast Auto Tracking System, worth pounds 200; the three runners-up will each win Panasonic TX-14S2R (similar, but without Teletext), worth pounds 180. Usual Newspaper Publishing competition rules apply.

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