THE WEEK IN REVIEW

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The Independent Culture
THE FILM

THE NEON BIBLE

Terence Davies, one of cinema's genuine originals, makes his first American film based on John Kennedy Toole's novel and starring Gena Rowlands.

Despite the genius of the images, Adam Mars-Jones felt strangely cheated. "Slow, but packed with epiphanies... to be treasured as the work of a uniquely talented film-maker," eulogised Time Out. "A heartbreaking masterpiece," declared i-D. "Like Proust gone to the Deep South," observed the Financial Times. "Disappointingly, a film you watch at a distance," concluded the Times.

At one of London's finest cinemas the Lumiere - (0171-836 0691) - and selected screens across the country.

Film-making for the big screen. To see it on video is to miss the point entirely.

The latest from Italian academic Umberto Eco who crossed "Who Murdered the Monks" with semiotics and hit pay-dirt with The Name of the Rose.

Robert Winder noted of the epilogue: "It is a gamble to insist that what we have just read is a waste of time. Readers can be forgiven if they do not laugh." "A lot of learning is a dangerous thing," opined the Sunday Times but praised "the exuberance of the narrative". "A skilful parade of recent literary theory and history of science. But it creates minds rather than hearts." The Times

Translated by William Weaver and published by Secker at pounds 16.99.

Eco loves Borges and Calvino. They both knew that brevity was the soul of this kind of wit. This novel is over 500 pages.

Stephen Daldry directs Ron Hutchinson's powerful study of passion, hatred and interrogation, the first in a series of classic revivals from the Royal Court glory days.

Paul Taylor (above) described the play as "a classic... brilliantly acted", but felt that the striking staging did not "serve the play well". Others agreed. "Although the war of words... fires the stage, the right sense of claustrophobia goes missing.," said the Evening Standard. "Exciting 'event' theatre," opined the Daily Telegraph. Rufus Sewell and Tony Doyle received unanimous rave reviews.

Duke of York's Theatre until 18 November (0171-836 5122)

Daldry does for this play what he did for The Kitchen: rebuilds the auditorium and stages it in the round. Flashy but a trifle unfocused.

As mannered and charismatic as ever, the tongue-in-cheek band have climbed out from beneath a wave of tabloid exposure for a tour.

Ryan Gilbey was slightly unconvinced. He was, seemingly, alone. "Onstage they are staggering. Brilliantly upfront and compellingly unfathomable. Jarvis Cocker is a star," enthused Melody Maker. "Better than the Smiths," sang the Independent on Sunday. "Cocker is rapidly becoming an unlikely but oddly inspirational spokesman for a lost generation determined to find itself again." Thus spake NME.

The band play Liverpool tonight, Cardiff on Sunday. Next week Exeter, Brighton and London. Check local press for details.

Cocker is what happens when a nerd goes a-vogueing, but the band's rise appears unstoppable.

THE NOVEL

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE

THE PLAY

RAT IN THE SKULL

THE GIG

PULP

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