Marcus Brigstocke, Planet Corduroy, Assembly Rooms

Memories are made of corduroy and flashes of edgy wit
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The Independent Culture

Aside from two years on Radio 4's The Now show, Marcus Brigstocke has appeared on screen in work ranging from Love Actually to BBC's The Savages, oh, and a Crunchie advert, which have helped make him a familiar face even if you can't put a name to it.

Aside from two years on Radio 4's The Now show, Marcus Brigstocke has appeared on screen in work ranging from Love Actually to BBC's The Savages, oh, and a Crunchie advert, which have helped make him a familiar face even if you can't put a name to it.

In this show the rest of Brigstocke's body plays catch-up in the memorability stakes, clad as he is head-to-toe in corduroy. The supply-teacher look is entirely fitting for a comic who started at Bristol University.

That said, there are flashes of the edgier comic that Brigstocke wants to be: it's as if he has a hankering to be a streetwise American-style satirist.

Planet Corduroy is a medley of the better political material of a number of British non-political stand-ups. There is the usual bucketload of antipathy towards Bush and Blair, but also towards Michael Howard and the Conservative lobby. Though Daily Mail readers are an easy and hackneyed target, Brigstocke gets a few more column inches out of them in a routine about his neighbour.

There are some lovely illustrations too; likening the toppling of Saddam Hussein's statue to a drunk falling down in the street holding a kebab. Good solid stuff and there could be better yet to come.

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