Lena Dunham: Girls talk

At 26, Lena Dunham is the creator and star of the most talked-about TV show in America. Here, she wins another fan in Sarah Hughes

A lot can happen in a year. The first time I talk to Lena Dunham, it's early 2011. Tiny Furniture, the second film she's directed, written and acted in, has just opened to strong reviews and she's begun filming Girls, a much anticipated sitcom for HBO produced by comedy king Judd Apatow. Not quite 25, she is garrulous, entertaining and open, perhaps overly so: she ends our interview by giving me her email address.

The second time we talk it's 2012, and Girls, an off-kilter look at the lives and loves of four twenty-something women in New York has become the most talked-about show in America. Now 26, Dunham also writes, produces, largely directs and stars in it, as wannabe writer Hannah Horvath. In the process, she has become a phenomenon, so in demand that, as reported last week, bidding by publishers for a proposed collection of autobiographical essays about sex, friendship and work, tentatively entitled Not That Kind of Girl, has reached $3.6 million.

So, what "kind of girl" is Dunham? My initial thought is that the person who turns up for our interview in a chic, fitted grey dress, with shiny hair and subtle make-up, seems far more polished and far less likely to share her contact details with strange reporters. But then she starts talking about her homesickness since moving to Los Angeles and it's clear the immaculate front is just that.

One of the most resonant things about Girls is the way it captures that period in your early twenties when you're supposed to be a grown-up but still feel young and confused. It's how Dunham herself still feels, at once declaring, "I'm a control freak", and admitting she can't quite cut the family apron strings. "I was just talking to my dad," she says. "He said, 'You're not getting enough sleep, come and talk to my doctor, get some vitamins from him.'" She giggles. "He still thinks I'm six years old."

The daughter of two renowned New York artists, Dunham readily admits to plundering her life for inspiration – "most of Hannah's mistakes are mine, only she makes, like, six of them in one episode; mine are more spread out."

In fact, her chief concern is not whether people like Girls but whether they find it honest. "The thing about Hannah is she's not constantly endearing. She's frustrating and complicated and weird and annoying," she says. She's also refreshingly real. Dunham's most interesting decision, one that has brought her equal amounts of opprobrium and praise, is to consistently display Hannah's (and by extension her own) body.

In an era when the female body is expected to be toned, tanned and taut, hers is pale, tattooed and unapologetically ordinary – and under the camera's harsh light, nothing is spared. When Hannah sits in the bath, we see the slight pudginess around her stomach. When she has sex, it's often awkward and ungainly. These are fascinating scenes because they're so rarely seen on TV, where sex is always either perfect or played for laughs, and young women saunter undressed through sitcoms so that we can admire their polished perfection. Dunham's honesty seems both admirable and brave.

Not that everyone sees it that way. Most notably, one female critic complained that Dunham "courted our rejection by walking around the house in nothing more than a T-shirt, flaunting her ass and thighs". Dunham chose to play off that comment at this year's Emmy Awards by taking part in the show's opening skit naked, and eating cake.

"It's comforting to me that a number of women do obviously understand where we're coming from," she says. "It was realistic to show Hannah wandering around in her T-shirt and having conversations in the bath. That's who she is."

She offers a similar defence on the first episode's riskiest line, when Hannah, liberated by a cup of opium tea, announces to her parents: "I think I may be the voice of my generation."

Dunham admits: "I knew it was a dangerous thing to put in, that people might say, who does this bitch think she is? But she's on opium, she's grasping at straws …. You're supposed to laugh at the character as much as with her." It's notable too that Hannah follows this with the amendment "… or at least a voice. Of a generation". It's a typical Dunham moment, undercutting a perceived arrogance with self-aware doubt.

What then of the accusations of privilege? Dunham grew up in Manhattan's Tribeca and attended St Ann's, an artsy private school in Brooklyn Heights, before going to university at the equally artsy Oberlin. Girls' other three stars had famous fathers: Zosia Mamet is the daughter of playwright David; Allison Williams, of NBC anchor Brian; and Jemima Kirke, Dunham's school friend, had former Free and Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke for a dad.

When we first met she joked that her then untitled show might as well be called the "Lena Dunham Project". Today she offers a more serious response. "Working with my friends makes me safe," she says. "That said, I really didn't know Allison until she was cast ... and then it was funny to realise that Brian Williams was her father. My real hope is that people recognise that they are all very talented and they've done a great job."

It's a polished answer, but then Dunham has become adept at defending herself and her show. Early in Girls' run, there was a furore over its lack of racial diversity. Speaking at Fortune magazine's Most Powerful Women summit last Tuesday, she said she felt "heartbreak at the idea that [Girls] would make anyone feel isolated… all I want to do is make women feel excited and included." To that end, the second season will have a more diverse cast, including rising comedy star and rapper Donald Glover, and Dunham told the Fortune summit that she's working hard to respond directly to fans "who are women of colour who want to see themselves reflected on screen".

"When I wrote Girls, I drew very heavily on my experiences - all the characters are a piece of me or based on people I know," she tells me. "It speaks to a very specific kind of experience … my biggest influence was those 1960s/'70s films about young girls trying to make it in the city – Georgy Girl, Girlfriends ...."

But what of Sex and the City? Before Girls had even aired, its settings and basic premise had seen it compared to the early Noughties sitcom, despite its very different tone. "I thought about this a lot ... and the key is that this is a show about girls whose expectations were formed by Sex and the City," she says. "They've grown up thinking, 'that's what life in New York is like'. A lot of the humour is drawn from the differences between those dreams and the reality."

In any case, Girls' dry, singular voice is closer to that of great female comedy writers of the 1970s and '80s, such as Nora Ephron, a heroine of Dunham's, and Saturday Night Live comic Gilda Radner. "It's amazing to be compared to people like that," she says, sounding awe-struck. "I think honestly I have very modest ideas. I don't have cinematic references. I stick with the sense of humour I know." She pauses, then adds with a sense of genuine surprise, as though still struggling to grasp the ways in which her life has changed over the past year. "I always think of myself as too much of a weirdo to have a voice that will reach a mass audience. I can't quite believe all this is real."

'Girls' starts on Sky Atlantic, at 10pm on 22 Oct

Arts and Entertainment
Rhino Doodle by Jim Carter (Downton Abbey)

TV
Arts and Entertainment
No Devotion's Geoff Rickly and Stuart Richardson
musicReview: No Devotion, O2 Academy Islington, London
Arts and Entertainment
Christian Grey cradles Ana in the Fifty Shades of Grey film

film
Arts and Entertainment
Chris Pratt stars in Guardians of the Galaxy
film
PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Comedian 'Weird Al' Yankovic

Is the comedy album making a comeback?

comedy
Arts and Entertainment
While many films were released, few managed to match the success of James Bond blockbuster 'Skyfall'
film
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Jamie Dornan as Christian Grey in the first-look Fifty Shades of Grey movie still

film
Arts and Entertainment
Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc, centre, are up for Best Female TV Comic for their presenting quips on The Great British Bake Off

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in the TV adaptation of 'Fargo'

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Shakespeare in Love at the Noel Coward Theatre
theatreReview: Shakespeare in Love has moments of sheer stage poetry mixed with effervescent fun
Arts and Entertainment
Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson stars in Hercules

film
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'

film
Arts and Entertainment
<p><strong>2008</strong></p>
<p>Troubled actor Robert Downey Jr cements his comeback from drug problems by bagging the lead role in Iron Man. Two further films follow</p>

film
Arts and Entertainment

theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Tycoons' text: Warren Buffett and Bill Gates both cite John Brookes' 'Business Adventures' as their favourite book

books
Arts and Entertainment
Panic! In The Disco's Brendon Urie performs on stage

music
Arts and Entertainment

film
Arts and Entertainment
Keira Knightley and Benedict Cumberbatch star in the Alan Turing biopic The Imitation Game

film
Arts and Entertainment

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Radio 4's Today programme host Evan Davis has been announced as the new face of Newsnight

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Pharrell Williams performing on the Main Stage at the Wireless Festival in Finsbury Park, north London

music
Arts and Entertainment
Carrie Mathison returns to the field in the fourth season of Showtime's Homeland

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Crowds soak up the atmosphere at Latitude Festival

music
Arts and Entertainment
Meyne Wyatt and Caren Pistorus arrive for the AACTA Aawrds in Sydney, Australia

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Rick Astley's original music video for 'Never Gonna Give You Up' has been removed from YouTube

music
Arts and Entertainment
Quentin Blake's 'Artists on the beach'

Artists unveils new exhibition inspired by Hastings beach

art
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Evan Davis: The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing to take over at Newsnight

    The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing

    What will Evan Davis be like on Newsnight?
    Finding the names for America’s shame: What happens to the immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert?

    Finding the names for America’s shame

    The immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert
    Inside a church for Born Again Christians: Speaking to God in a Manchester multiplex

    Inside a church for Born Again Christians

    As Britain's Anglican church struggles to establish its modern identity, one branch of Christianity is booming
    Rihanna, Kim Kardashian and me: How Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

    Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

    Parisian couturier Pierre Balmain made his name dressing the mid-century jet set. Today, Olivier Rousteing – heir to the house Pierre built – is celebrating their 21st-century equivalents. The result? Nothing short of Balmania
    Cancer, cardiac arrest, HIV and homelessness - and he's only 39

    Incredible survival story of David Tovey

    Tovey went from cooking for the Queen to rifling through bins for his supper. His is a startling story of endurance against the odds – and of a social safety net failing at every turn
    Backhanders, bribery and abuses of power have soared in China as economy surges

    Bribery and abuses of power soar in China

    The bribery is fuelled by the surge in China's economy but the rules of corruption are subtle and unspoken, finds Evan Osnos, as he learns the dark arts from a master
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Highland terriers stole the show at the opening ceremony

    Highland terriers steal the show at opening ceremony

    Gillian Orr explores why a dog loved by film stars and presidents is finally having its day
    German art world rocked as artists use renowned fat sculpture to distil schnapps

    Brewing the fat from artwork angers widow of sculptor

    Part of Joseph Beuys' 1982 sculpture 'Fettecke' used to distil schnapps
    BBC's The Secret History of Our Streets reveals a fascinating window into Britain's past

    BBC takes viewers back down memory lane

    The Secret History of Our Streets, which returns with three films looking at Scottish streets, is the inverse of Benefits Street - delivering warmth instead of cynicism
    Joe, film review: Nicolas Cage delivers an astonishing performance in low budget drama

    Nicolas Cage shines in low-budget drama Joe

    Cage plays an ex-con in David Gordon Green's independent drama, which has been adapted from a novel by Larry Brown
    How to make your own gourmet ice lollies, granitas, slushy cocktails and frozen yoghurt

    Make your own ice lollies and frozen yoghurt

    Think outside the cool box for this summer's tempting frozen treats
    Ford Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time, with sales topping 4.1 million since 1976

    Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time

    Sales have topped 4.1 million since 1976. To celebrate this milestone, four Independent writers recall their Fiestas with pride
    10 best reed diffusers

    Heaven scent: 10 best reed diffusers

    Keep your rooms smelling summery and fresh with one of these subtle but distinctive home fragrances that’ll last you months
    Commonwealth Games 2014: Female boxers set to compete for first time

    Female boxers set to compete at Commonwealth Games for first time

    There’s no favourites and with no headguards anything could happen
    Five things we’ve learned so far about Manchester United under Louis van Gaal

    Five things we’ve learned so far about United under Van Gaal

    It’s impossible to avoid the impression that the Dutch manager is playing to the gallery a little