The Week In Radio: Saturday morning fever with master muso Mary Anne

 

"In another life I would have been out on the road DJing and dragging a record box around in the middle of the night in some shady club," remarked Mary Anne Hobbs at the start of her new weekend breakfast show on BBC6 Music.

Hobbs was referring to her last job as a club DJ, one of her many working incarnations that have also included Sounds journalist, Radio 1 Breezeblock stalwart and presenter on XFM. In recent years, when most people her age are putting the kettle on and warming up the telly in readiness for Saturday Kitchen, Hobbs has been packing up the decks, waving goodbye to the boggle-eyed masses and crawling home to her bed.

Hobbs is a million miles from the presenters who are handed a mug of coffee and a playlist at the start of their shift, and politely requested to get on with it. She is a proper DJ who lugs records around with her like the rest of us carry handbags and who, unlike most in the throes of middle age, doesn't appear to fantasise about lying a sofa in a fleece-lined muumuu at the end of a day's work and using the cat as a pillow.

She's a woman with a vast musical knowledge, an enthusiasm that has remained undimmed since her early days under the wing of John Peel, and who absorbs new sounds like Betty Ford absorbed cocktails. So all credit to BBC6 Music for employing her (if even if you wonder what took them so long). Unlike its rivals, the station refuses to be dazzled by youth. It also hires female presenters not for their capacity to be wrist-slittingly bubbly in the early hours (hello Vanessa!), but on the basis that they are dedicated, world-class muso bores. In a good way, of course.

So, the new show. Hobbs's silkily hushed voice was perfect for this time of the morning. None of your nails-down-a-blackboard, Feltz-style quacking here. There was, it has to be said, a little too much nervous laughter and too much awestruck thanks at being allowed to sit in a studio in Salford in the early hours of a Saturday as if we, the listeners, had somehow been instrumental in her appointment.

On Sunday's show there was also a strange and ill-fitting feature show called "The Three-Minute Epiphany" in which the philosopher Roman Krznaric droned on about "the age of outrospection" and how we should all be nice to one another. But there was also an endless stream of classic, oddball, obscure and glorious records, each of them introduced by Hobbs with a sense of awe and astonishment that they had ever got made. For a weekend musical education, you couldn't hope for a safer pair of hands.

On Monday evening, another new signing was battling with first-day nerves.

Alice Levine, a former MTV presenter, made her broadcasting debut on Radio 1, alongside co-presenter Phil Taggart, on the late-night new music show made famous by John Peel. The pair certainly had chemistry, with the confident, charismatic Levine playing eye-rolling older sister to Taggart's over-excited schoolboy.

There was the odd teething problem, most notably in the form of a webcam that had been rigged up in the waiting area in order that we could spy on loitering guests, and which came with a migraine-inducing echo. "This is groundbreaking," declared Taggart, before stepping out of the studio and in front of the camera, leaning over guest Charli XCX and inadvertently revealing two acres of underpants.

The music was by turns interesting and atrocious, which is pretty much what we got in the days of Peel. Although, to be fair, I don't ever recall him flashing his pants.

twitter.com/FionaSturges

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

    Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

    Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
    Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

    Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

    When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
    5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

    In grandfather's footsteps

    5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
    Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

    Martha Stewart has flying robot

    The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
    Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

    Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

    Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
    A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

    A tale of two presidents

    George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
    Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

    The dining car makes a comeback

    Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
    Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

    Gallery rage

    How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
    Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

    Eye on the prize

    Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
    Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

    Women's rugby

    Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
    Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

    The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

    With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
    Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

    How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

    As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
    We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

    We will remember them

    Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
    Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

    Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

    Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
    Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

    Acting in video games gets a makeover

    David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices