Top Gear turns 21: The things you never knew about the BBC show as it returns for a 21st series

You might not think Jeremy Clarkson's brand of humour, Richard Hammond's haircuts or James May's shirts are worthy of celebration, but as the motoring programme returns for its 21st series since a 2002 relaunch in its current, laddish format, Jamie Merrill presents 21 things you never knew or never wanted to know about one of Britain's biggest TV exports

1. It rules the internet

Forget the Reith Lectures or David Attenborough's latest wildlife epic. The most popular show on BBC iPlayer last year was the Top Gear team's geographically illiterate search for the source of the river Nile, with a staggering 3.4m requests.

2. It's not known for its liberal views

Oh, they are cheeky chaps on Top Gear. Last month one of them posted a funny picture on Twitter of Jezza (that's Jeremy Clarkson) asleep with a sign in front that read, "gay ****". Ben Summerskill, chief executive of Stonewall, is, like many of us, fed up with it all. He said: "Now they're 21, perhaps the boys will grow up?"

3. It's not really for grown-ups, anyway

In Radio Times last week, the show's executive producer admitted the show is "aimed at people with a mental age of nine".

4. It's not universally loved by motoring hacks

You might think Jezza was a hero of the motoring hack world, but that's not strictly accurate. Neil Lyndon, the Sunday Telegraph's motoring correspondent, sums its 21st birthday well: "Does that mean Billy Bunter and his gang finally get forced out of the Fourth Remove and into long trousers?"

The mysterious Stig The mysterious Stig 5. Don't expect car-buying advice

It's an in-joke in the show that they don't do car tests. You would be mad to make a purchases based on Jezza's verdict.

6. Clarkson is a YouTube star

Stray down the motoring internet hole and you'll find lovingly posted videos of "Clarkson the early years" with incredibly loud hair reviewing 1990s cars in an oddly sensible manner. Very disturbing viewing.

7. It used to offer real advice

Before the lads took over, it was real car-reviewing show with presenters such as Angela Rippon who gave practical reviews of down-to-earth workhorses such as Cavaliers or Mini Metros.

8. The world loves it …

Top Gear is already screened in more than 100 countries.

9. ... but not Mexico

A run of borderline-racist slurs about Mexico when testing the country's first sports car didn't go down well several seasons ago.

10. The "reasonably priced" cars take quite a battering

Denis Chick, of Vauxhall, is brave to have lent the show a fleet of his Astras. He said: "Vauxhall Astra sales would not improve if everyone drove like Jimmy Carr around the Dunsfold track." The comedian hilariously took his test car's front off-side tyre clean off its rim.

Jeremy Clarkson leans against a sadly dated car Jeremy Clarkson leans against a sadly dated car 11. It makes the BBC a fortune

The three middle-aged men have brought the show to the front of the BBC's commercial arms global profit drive. Last year shows such as Doctor Who and Top Gear made the BBC's commercial arm more than £300m.

12. And Clarkson doesn't do badly

Last year Jezza netted more than £14m from the show, the real engine of his wealth being the BBC buying out his 30 per cent shares in the company he set up to exploit the show's commercial opportunities. That's enough for 140,000 speeding tickets.

13. It's not for girls

When the show relaunched in 2002, the BBC wanted to hire an unnamed female presenter. Her agent also sent along Richard Hammond, then a former local radio presenter working on an unheard-of cable channel. Sadly for the automotive sisterhood, it preferred him.

14. Even Jezza is bored by cars

In 2002, Jeremy was only available because his BBC chat show had flopped. Prior to that he was bored with cars, and after testing one car couldn't think of anything to say about it.

15. There's a waiting list

Watching the lads' banter is so popular there is a lottery-type draw for audience tickets to each series.

Jeremy Clarkson, pictured here in 1995 Jeremy Clarkson, pictured here in 1995 16. World domination

The show will front a new global BBC Brit channel which the corporation hopes will fill a "gap in the global market". Apologies, world.

17. Women watch it

Oddly it seems up to 40 per cent of Top Gear viewers are women.

18. Complaints, it's had a few

The BBC has responded to complaints on all manner of subjects on the show, from Clarkson damaging a 30-year-old chestnut tree with a pick-up truck to the use of the phrase "ginger beer" for rhyming slang for "queer" (see 1).

19. Jason Dawe

The man they axed in favour of James May (or Captain Slow) in Top Gear's second post-relaunch series. He now writes about used cars. Oh, the glamour.

20. Video games

If tonight's episode isn't enough high-octane nonsense for you, there's always the chance to hear Jezza, Captain Slow and the Hamster on the latest Forza video game on the Xbox One. They are the official voices of the game.

21. Catch it on Dave

It might be the BBC's most bankable export, but it has also driven the success of Freeview channel Dave, where, if you were so tempted, you could watch the show at pretty much any time of the day or night.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Elizabeth McGovern as Cora, Countess of Grantham and Richard E Grant as Simon Bricker

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Art
Arts and Entertainment
Diana Beard, nicknamed by the press as 'Dirty Diana'

Bake Off
Arts and Entertainment
The X Factor 2014 judges: Simon Cowell, Cheryl Cole, Mel B and Louis Walsh

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Gregg Wallace was caught by a camera van driving 32mph over the speed limit

TV
Arts and Entertainment
books
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Iain reacts to his GBBO disaster

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Outlaw Pete is based on an eight-minute ballad from Springsteen’s 2009 Working on a Dream album

books
Arts and Entertainment
Cara Delevingne made her acting debut in Anna Karenina in 2012

film
Arts and Entertainment
Simon Cowell is less than impressed with the Strictly/X Factor scheduling clash

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Gothic revival: artist Dave McKean’s poster for Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination
Exhibition
Arts and Entertainment
Diana Beard has left the Great British Bake Off 2014

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Lisa Kudrow, Courtney Cox and Jennifer Anniston reunite for a mini Friends sketch on Jimmy Kimmel Live

TV
Arts and Entertainment
TVDessert week was full of the usual dramas as 'bingate' ensued
Arts and Entertainment
Clara and the twelfth Doctor embark on their first adventure together
TVThe regulator received six complaints on Saturday night
Arts and Entertainment
Vinyl demand: a factory making the old-style discs
musicManufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl
Arts and Entertainment
David Baddiel concedes his show takes its inspiration from the hit US series 'Modern Family'
comedyNew comedy festival out to show that there’s more to Jewish humour than rabbi jokes
Arts and Entertainment
Puff Daddy: One Direction may actually be able to use the outrage to boost their credibility

music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

    US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
    Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
    Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
    Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

    The big names to look for this fashion week

    This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
    Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
    Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

    Neil Lawson Baker interview

    ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
    The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

    The model for a gadget launch

    Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
    Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
    Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

    Get well soon, Joan Rivers

    She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
    Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

    A fresh take on an old foe

    Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering