Horizon: OCD: A Monster In My Mind, TV review: Highlighting how complicated brains are

The BBC Two programme showed the reality of living with the condition - as well as giving a fascinating insight into treatments

Click to follow
The Independent Culture

While most of us are aware that Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is much more than simply liking cleaning as much as Monica from Friends does, OCD: A Monster in my Mind showed the reality of living with the condition - as well as giving a fascinating insight into treatments.

The most shocking segment was watching sufferer Richard make a sandwich. We saw him washing, rewashing, and breaking down, food untouched, the fear of "contamination" too great. "If I was stronger, I'd have killed myself a long time ago," he said.

 

Presenter Uta Frith made a compelling frontwoman, calling on a raft of experts. She had the ability to convey the complexities of neuroscience to us laymen, as well as the empathy to get subjects to open up. Eighteen-year-old year-old Sophie was obsessed that she might have killed someone, always looking for dead bodies. Her therapist made her walk around the street with a backpack full of murder weapons – facing up to her anxieties in a brutal, but apparently effective way.

Elsewhere, Nanda opted for Deep Brain Stimulation, a treatment not available in the UK that re-routed "out-of-control" brain circuits thought to cause OCD. Post op, her anxieties remained but she was optimistic for the future. Above all, this programme highlighted how complicated our brains are, and how those working to treat them deserve our attention.

Comments