The Daily Show: Watch Trevor Noah's debut opening monologue as he takes over from Jon Stewart

'Once more, a job American’s rejected is being done be an immigrant'

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The Independent Culture

After a 16 year tenure on The Daily Show, the much loved Jon Stewart stepped down as host on 6 August, leaving a huge hole in the late-night TV schedule. 

Months passed and fans eagerly awaited the show’s return with it's new host, Trevor Noah. The South African comedian debuted on Comedy Central on 28 September, beginning his first show with a two-minute monologue in which he thanked Stewart and The Daily Show viewers. 

“Growing up in the dusty streets of South Africa I never dreamed I would one day have two things: an indoor toilet and a job as host of the daily show. And now I have both, and I’m quite comfortable with one of them” Watch the clip below, in which Noah praises the previous host and goes on to talk about the Pope's visit to the US. 

“Jon Stewart was more than just a late-night host, he was often our voice, our refuge and, in many ways, our political Dad. And it’s weird because Dad has left. Now it feels like the family has a new Step-Dad, and he’s black which is not ideal.”

Jon Stewart was more than just a late-night host, he was often our voice, our refuge and, in many ways, our political Dad

Trevor Noah

He then spoke about why Comedy Central chose neither a woman nor an American to host the show, saying the channel did ask but no-one accepted the job offer. 

“So, once more, a job American’s rejected is being done be an immigrant.”

Noah’s debut has had a mixed reception. The Daily Beast said how the host made crude and clumsy jokes rather than poignant observational humour, while The Guardian said the host was saved by flashes of inspiration. 

Popular astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson congratulated Noah’s new opening credits for showing the Earth rotating in the right direction

The Washington Post were full of praise for the new host, saying “The Daily Show is back, with its essential wit and irreverence intact.”

What do you think of his debut?

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