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South Park (Vols 3 & 4, pounds 10.99 each)

As the likes of King of the Hill and even, to a certain extent, The Simpsons maintain their courtship of the cartoon sophisticates, it's heartening to see that South Park is still pandering to the viewing public's basest instincts. Quite how much we can stand of Trey Parker and Matt Stone's puerile creations depends on how we feel about the merchandising frenzy taking place in a high street near you. (Have you noticed how the soft toy versions are much better realised than the 2-D originals?)

In these two volumes, Cartman continues to cement his position as one of the great, obnoxious comic characters of the Nineties. His choice of costume for the school Halloween party in "Pinkeye" is typically offensive. There's loads more puerile fun in the remaining three episodes ("An Elephant Makes Love To A Pig", "Death" and "Tom's Rhinoplasty") , the highlight being Kyle's attempt to mate the eponymous pachyderm with Cartman's pot- bellied pig for his science project.

Stella Street pounds 12.99

Maybe it's living over the San Andreas fault. Perhaps it's the lack of community spirit in the unforgiving avenues of Beverly Hills. Or could it be the architectural splendour of suburban England? Whatever the reason, the unremarkable titular byway of pre-war semis is now the home to some of Hollywood's biggest names.

First broadcast last Christmas in 10 episodes and enjoying a second series at the moment, Stella Street combines the talents of performers Phil Cornwell and John Sessions. A bizarre parody of Hello! magazine's domestic nosing and amateur video diary, it somehow works. When not beating up his cleaner, Mrs Huggett, Michael Caine is our guide to the street, informing us to steer clear of Joe Pesci and to ignore Jimmy Hill. Best of all is the Rolling Stones' entry into the grocery trade, Mick and Keith's Corner Shop, a shambolic store in which Dirk Bogarde rarely allows himself to be seen.

Cornwell's impressions are spot-on, unlike Sessions' attempts, which only adds to the fun.

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