A C Grayling

A. C. Grayling is an English philosopher and founder of independent undergraduate college, New College of the Humanities. He is the author of several books including The Refutation of Scepticism (1985), The Meaning of Things (2001) and The Good Book (2011).

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A baby with three parents? This is a scientific breakthrough we should be celebrating

This announcement should have been made with a great fanfare; it gives hope to the childless and only reactionary moralists could find reason to oppose it

Dogma will always lead to murder. In the end, scepticism is the only answer

The Woolwich killers were certain that faith supported their actions

Thatcher: Respect for the dead is an outdated and foolish principle

Let us say what we think, and be frank about it: death does not confer privilege

Creationist free schools are an abuse - ancient ignorance has no place in education

Young minds are primed by nature to believe most of what adults tell them to believe. They should be treated with respect, not twisted into shapes that conform with dogma

Cross my heart: Terence Rattigan’s evergreen play The Winslow Boy hinges on truth and lies

Don't tell lies. But don't tell untimely truths either

A writer who won an award for the brutality of one of her reviews cited her obligation to be honest. Should we all live by such standards?

Escape route: Bugarach in the French Pyrenees, a place of safety in the event of extinction?

A short history of the end of the world

The Mayans are staking their credibility in forecasting the planet's last day. Why doesn't the near certainty of humiliation deter the doomsayers?

It's not 'unnatural' for two gay men to have a child together

The fact is that nothing is truly unnatural, because everything that exists, including human intelligence, is a product of nature

The thought police: How come the world doesn't add up?

Brief Answers To Big Questions

The thought police: Brief Answers To Big Questions- 2. Can roses grow from thistles?

When botanists say that the rose is related to the thistle, are they reporting a discovery or making a decision? That is, are they telling us about the real nature of the world, or are they choosing to group certain things together because doing so is - to put it bluntly - useful?
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