Adam Jacques

Adam Jacques is a features writer for The Independent on Sunday.

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How We Met: Enda Walsh & Cillian Murphy - "We went from being effectively on the dole to performing at festivals around the world"

Murphy met the award-winning playwright and theatre director in 1996 when he auditioned for the Cork theatre group Corcadorca

Susan Hill: The Woman in Black author talks evil urges, prison reform and angry drivers

Murder is a boring subject There are only certain ways people can kill and it's not very interesting to write about. With my crime novels, I'm not interested in whodunit, but whydunit: most murders are committed within the family, or from within the neighbourhood; very rarely are the police left baffled.

Simon Callow: The actor and writer on Jesus, a hatred of monster virus verbs, and the curse of Four Weddings and a Funeral

Every time I'm on stage I feel that I'm making the case for the theatre [Callow has appeared in more than 40 different stage productions over his 40-year stage career]. The theatre is an incredibly precious place; it's a chance to convince people that it's a life-changing and necessary experience filled with extraordinary emotions; it's an aesthetic version of the National Health Service, giving people new life, hope and energy.

Charlie Higson: The author and actor talks zombies, dyed hair and telling dad jokes

Unless the older generation gets out of the way, the younger generation can't take their place I'm interested in the Fisher King myth: how this old king was so frightened by the new generation that he wanted to kill them.

Lewis Pugh: The world's leading cold-water swimmer on pain, the plight of the penguins and taking time over tea

As a young boy I saw myself as Sir Edmund Hillary, and water as my Everest When Hillary and Tenzing Norgay walked up Everest, they didn't know whether they would be coming down again; it's a pioneer mindset. Similarly, as a cold-water swimmer, standing on the edge of the sea ice as you're about to dive into the black water is terrifying: I don't know what will happen by the end of the swim – or even if I will still be alive.

James Rhodes: The concert pianist on mental illness and opening up about sexual abuse

Somewhere along the line, classical music has been appropriated A guy walks on in a monkey suit and perpetuates the "amazing scowling genius shrouded in my own artistry" thing. Instead, why not introduce this guy Bach, who was surrounded by death – 11 of his children died in infancy, and then the love of his life dies – then play a piece he wrote in her memory. People will get more from it than by reading an Oxford don's programme notes.

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