Adrian Hamilton

The Independent’s former comment editor, Adrian Hamilton writes a weekly column largely on international affairs with particular focus on the Middle East, Iran and foreign policy issues. Before joining the paper he was deputy editor of the Observer newspaper.

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‘Saying Farewell at Hsun-yang’ by Qiu Ying

Unscrolling the masterpieces that were made in China at the V&A

The UK's first major exhibition of Chinese paintings since 1935 reveals that far from being monolithic, the art of the country is highly individualistic, propelled by artists with their own distinctive styles

'Seated Male, holding left knee, left profile', by CJ Natoire

Art review: The Male Nude, The Wallace Collection, London

The male nudes in the Wallace Collection’s new exhibition display  a painstaking proficiency, but they’re unlikely to arouse much passion, says Adrian Hamilton

Exhibition of the week: An American in London: Whistler and the Thames, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London SE21

Not the least virtues of Dulwich's small show is the emphasis it gives to Whistler's prints. Black-and-white engravings have fallen from taste since his day but the ones here remind us how direct an artistic media etching is – and how Whistler mastered it.

‘The Last of Old Westminster’ (1862)

The river runs deep: Whistler in London

A new exhibition of Whistler’s etchings and paintings of the Thames displays his extraordinary talent for capturing the atmosphere and bustle of life in 19th-century London, says Adrian Hamilton

Exhibition of the week: The EY Exhibition: Paul Klee, Tate Modern, London SE1

You can never have too much of Paul Klee. Ten years since the last major show, Tate Modern's exhibition aims to be the most comprehensive, taking Klee from his entry on the art scene in 1910 to his death in 1940.

'Park near Lu' (1938)

Paul Klee: Triumph of a 'degenerate'

Denounced by the Nazis, Klee is one of the best-known Modernist artists, yet he has not been as influential as his contemporaries. A new Tate exhibition will change that, says Adrian Hamilton

Sugimura Jihei, mid-1680s

The largest show of Japanese erotic artworks ever seen

The British Museum's new exhibition may be hardcore, but it's the humour and humanity that really thrills, says Adrian Hamilton

Exhibition of the week: Australia, Royal Academy of Arts, London W1

The Royal Academy's show presents 200 works covering 200 years of a country which has long found expression in visual art. A glorious opening gallery presents the visitor with works by contemporary native artists of extraordinary breadth.

The wizardry of Oz: Charles Meere’s ‘Australian Beach Pattern’ (1940)

Australia’s day in the sun, at the Royal Academy of Arts

It’s been a long time coming, but the Royal Academy’s survey of Australian art hosts some glorious work, and tells the fascinating story of a country struggling with its identity – and reconciling itself with its past

Exhibition of the week: Tom Phillips, Flowers Gallery, London W1

Tom Phillips has been engaged in a kind of mad, off-kilter art-play all his life – he is 76 – a practice involving the refining and revisiting of favourite themes.

Day In a Page

Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail. If you think it's awful, then just don't watch it'

Ricky Gervais: 'People are waiting for me to fail'

As the second series of his divisive sitcom 'Derek' hits screens, the comedian tells James Rampton why he'll never bow to the critics who habitually circle his work
Mad Men series 7, TV review: The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge

Mad Men returns for a final fling

The suits are still sharp, but Don Draper has lost his edge
Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground as there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit

Google finds a lift into space will never get off the ground

Technology giant’s scientists say there is no material strong enough for a cable from Earth into orbit
Westminster is awash with tales of young men being sexually harassed - but it's far from being just a problem in politics

Is sexual harassment a fact of gay life?

Westminster is awash with tales of young men being sexually harassed - but it's far from being just a problem in politics
Moshi Monster creator Michael Acton Smith: The man behind a British success story

Moshi Monster creator Michael Acton Smith

Acton Smith launched a world of virtual creatures who took the real world by storm
Kim Jong-un's haircut: The Independent heads to Ealing to try out the dictator's do

Our journalist tries out Kim Jong-un's haircut

The North Korean embassy in London complained when M&M Hair Academy used Kim Jong-un's image in the window. Curious, Guy Pewsey heads to the hair salon and surrenders to the clippers
A History of the First World War in 100 moments: A forgotten naval victory in which even Nature played a part

A History of the First World War in 100 moments

A forgotten naval victory in which even Nature played a part
Vespa rides on with launch of Primavera: Iconic Italian scooter still revving up millions of sales

Vespa rides on with launch of the Primavera

The Vespa has been a style icon since the 1950s and the release this month of its latest model confirms it has lost little of its lustre
Record Store Day: Independent music shops can offer a tempting alternative to downloads

Record Store Day celebrates independent music shops

This Saturday sees a host of events around the country to champion the sellers of well-grooved wax
Taunton's policy of putting philosophy at heart of its curriculum is one of secrets of its success

Education: Secret of Taunton's success

Taunton School, in Somerset, is one of the country's leading independent schools, says Richard Garner
10 best smartphones

10 best smartphones

With a number of new smartphones on the market, we round up the best around, including some more established models
Mickey Arthur: Aussie tells ECB to stick with Ashley Giles

Mickey Arthur: Aussie tells ECB to stick with Ashley Giles

The former Australia coach on why England must keep to Plan A, about his shock at their collapse Down Under, why he sent players home from India and the agonies of losing his job
Homelessness: Why is the supported lodgings lifeline under threat?

Why is the supported lodgings lifeline under threat?

Zubairi Sentongo swapped poverty in Uganda for homelessness in Britain. But a YMCA scheme connected him with a couple offering warmth and shelter
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: When the world’s biggest shed took over Regent’s Park

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

When the world’s biggest shed took over Regent’s Park
The pain of IVF

The pain of IVF

As an Italian woman vows to keep the babies from someone else’s eggs, Julian Baggini ponders how the reality of childbirth is often messier than the natural ideal