Adrian Hamilton

The Independent’s former comment editor, Adrian Hamilton writes a weekly column largely on international affairs with particular focus on the Middle East, Iran and foreign policy issues. Before joining the paper he was deputy editor of the Observer newspaper.

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R B Kitaj’s ‘The Wedding’ (1989-93)

R B Kitaj retrospective comes to London a decade after he fled Britain over 'anti-Semitism'

An American who spent his life in England, the artist Kitaj was so incensed by “anti-Semitic” reviews of his Tate show in 1994, he left the country. Six years after his death, a pair of shows reassess his legacy

Turner-Prize winning artist Simon Starling (right) stands in front of his new film installation Phantom Ride commissioned by Tate Britain which shows images of artworks that been shown at the Tate in the past.

Art review: Tate Britain's self-reflexive new commission 'Phantom Ride' by Simon Starling is elegantly executed but too restricted

Public galleries make much of their artist commissions these days. The more traditional their collections, the more directors want to give a contemporary zing to their establishments by presenting a new work by a contemporary artist. But they are, by nature constrictive. You ask an artist to make a statement about the collection, the edifice or whatever, but too often it remains just that: a statement rooted to a place by the terms of the deal.

Exhibition of the week: Barocci: Brilliance and Grace, National Gallery, London WC2

British museums are short of paintings by the Italian mannerists and post-Renaissance artists, and Federico Barocci was recognised by his peers as the finest of his generation.

World View: Be realistic about Obama’s trip to Israel – he’s going because he has to

Plus: With billions wasted through corruption, lack of security and poor contracts, the true cost of our failure in Iraq is beyond count

Federico Barocci’s ‘Entombment of Christ’ (1579-82)

Simply divine: Barocci at the National Gallery

In his day, the 16th-century Italian artist Federico Barocci could count the Pope among his patrons – yet his work is almost unknown in Britain. A spectacular new show at the National Gallery will change that

A shift in the Vatican? If you believe the Pope is retiring, you’ll believe anything

Plus, the so-called "Friends of Syria" have taken the worst of all possible courses

Duchamp's Nude Descending a Staircase (No.2) ( 1912)

The French Connection: Marcel Duchamp's American legacy is explored in new exhibition

When the Dadaist left Occupied France for New York, his influence on the American cultural scene ranged from art to dance and music. Adrian Hamilton explores an exhilarating new show at the Barbican

Exhibition of the Week: Lichtenstein: A Retrospective, Tate Modern, London SE1

With an artist so well known, it is tempting for a gallery to try and freshen him up with a novel interpretation. Mercifully, Tate Modern has decided to play it straight.

Man Ray's 'Solarized Portrait of Lee Miller' (c1929)

Exhibition of the Week: Man Ray Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, London WC2

Leading light of the surrealists, lover of women, ever experimental in form, Man Ray was also a supreme portrait photographer for his friends and for fashion magazines from the Twenties into the Seventies.

It doesn’t help getting in a tizzy over North Korea

Plus, what the President didn't say in his State of the Union address

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Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence