Alistair Dawber

Alistair Dawber is The Independent's Spain correspondent. He has twice been the foreign editor and was also Jerusalem correspondent. Alistair initially worked on the business desk as investment editor.

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Postcard from... Madrid

Benjamin Netanyahu’s office said the scheme aimed to ‘strengthen Israeli public diplomacy’

Israel's stance over Iran's nuclear programme is becoming difficult to sustain

The Jewish state’s nuclear deterrent is something it wants everyone to know about, but won’t acknowledge

UN set to begin chemical weapons investigation in Syria

Weapons inspectors could finally be about to begin investigating claims that the regime in Syria has used chemical munitions during the country’s bloody civil war after a deal was struck to allow them into the country.

Houses (foreground) of a West Bank settlement in Maale Adumim

Israel won't sign EU agreements until settlement clause is removed

Leading ministers would rather forgo millions in research grants than agree to anti-settlement conditions

A Bedouin woman sits next to what is left of houses destroyed by Israeli authorities in Al-Akarib village, in the Israeli Negev Desert

'This is our land': Protests at plan to remove Bedouins from ancestral villages

The so-called 'Prawer plan' is being fought in and outside Israel

Barcelona footballer Lionel Messi places a wish on Jerusalem’s Western Wall

Barcelona footballer Lionel Messi takes a shot at peace

Barcelona footballer Lionel Messi placed a wish in Jerusalem’s Western Wall today as he and his team-mates completed a two-day “peace tour” of Israel and the West Bank  that included a training clinic for young Palestinians in Hebron and meetings with the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem.

Tzipi Livni, the Israeli justice minister and chief negotiator in the peace talks abstained from the vote, but is understood to have attacked the decision during the cabinet meeting

Israel's cabinet approves new national priorities plan

Israel’s cabinet today approved a new national priorities plan, which will see preferential funding going to outposts in the occupied West Bank, which just a few months ago, even the Israel government considered to be illegal.

Nigel Kennedy with The Palestine Strings at Jerusalem Festival 2012

Palestinian orchestra takes centre stage at The Proms with Kennedy’s support

There is little that is more quintessentially British than the proms, but on Thursday the Royal Albert Hall will hear a youth orchestra from the Occupied Territories, which has been asked to perform alongside Nigel Kennedy. The Palestine Strings travelled to London today.

Israel could be about to embark on a major building project in West Bank

Middle East peace process hits stumbling block as Israel 'considers new West Bank building project'

Israel could be about to embark on a major building project in West Bank settlements, just a day after the US Secretary of State, John Kerry, announced that peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians were back on track.

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine