Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and News Reporter. He writes a restaurant column for The Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Thursdays). He presents ‘Power Lunch’ on London Live TV (Thursdays), a one-to-one interview with the most influential people in the capital. Previously, Amol worked on Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office. He is currently a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has also written a book called ‘Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket’s Greatest Spin Bowlers’.

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Verden, restaurant review: Come for the excellent wine, stay for the even better food

Amol Rajan is dazzled by an east London gem

Letter from the Editor: Merkel's global dominance secured by crises in Europe

Henry Kissinger never actually asked “who do I call if I want to speak to Europe?”; but if any modern successor to the master of realpolitik posed that question, there could be little doubt about the answer.

Antidote, restaurant review: One visit to Mikael Jonsson's Soho venue just won't be enough

12A Newburgh Street, London W1, Tel: 020 7287 8488

Letter from the Editor: Cricket and the free market don’t necessarily mix

By the time you read this, the first match in the latest Cricket World Cup will just be finished. Yet as we go into the premier tournament of the sport I love, I’m feeling very uneasy about its future. To explain why, I want to give you a parallel with political philosophy.

Letter from the Editor: Does anyone have the guts to defend the Big Society?

Speaking in Liverpool on 19 July 2010, David Cameron explained his mission in politics.

The Greek Larder, restaurant review: Amid the bleakest architecture, can the Real Greek founder's venture transport diners to Athens?

ArtHouse, 1 York Way, London N1, Tel: 020 3780 2999. £60 for two, without wine

Letter from the Editor: It's 'Morning all: the backlash'. And this time I'm ready

Last week, when I wrote here that I was dropping the introduction “Morning all”, I hoped one or two of you might write in to defend it. In fact, the letters streamed in – and not all of them full of affection, let me tell you.

Letter from the Editor: A brave new dawn for anyone who still reads this column

The 'Morning all' is gone forever as my opening gambit. Expunged, eradicated, exterminated: never to return

Letter from the Editor: What better reply to terror than the great Dave Brown?

For those not inclined to take an interest in these matters, it might seem the height of vanity to argue that what happened in Paris this week was a story in which we in Britain are deeply involved. But as an editor and a journalist, I think it would be naive to believe that we were not involved.

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Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

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Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003