Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and News Reporter. He writes a restaurant column for The Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Thursdays). He presents ‘Power Lunch’ on London Live TV (Thursdays), a one-to-one interview with the most influential people in the capital. Previously, Amol worked on Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office. He is currently a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has also written a book called ‘Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket’s Greatest Spin Bowlers’.

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Bar Esteban, restaurant review: It's Brooklyn meets Barcelona in north London

On first impressions, and aside from the alliteration, there isn't much to unite Barcelona and Brooklyn. In fact, plenty separates them, not least the Atlantic. Barcelona: Gaudi, cava, Sonar festival, the Nou Camp. Brooklyn: brownstones in Fort Greene and Park Slope, a young Beckham, rye whisky, the notorious bridge. Then again, Hispanics and Latinos make up a fifth – and growing – portion of Brooklyn's population, albeit not many of them speak Catalan.

Caribbean time: the Pelican Bar

Jamaica: Knocked for six by a Caribbean curiosity

Hidden away on Treasure Beach is Jakes, a hotel with a history like no other. Honeymooner? Cricket fan? This is the place to come, says Amol Rajan

Campaigners protest against the illegal trade in wildlife outside the conference venue, Lancaster House in London, yesterday

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The odds are stacked against the Wright Brothers. First of all, their latest restaurant is in Spitalfields Market, which nobody aged 30 or over should ever be seen near. Second, this is a seafood place, and I've just come back from Italy and Cornwall, where I had so much fish that the thought of another crustacean makes me ill. Third, this restaurant is out and proud about its crustacea – which means you have the dubious pleasure of seeing them fighting in huge tanks barely two metres from the seating area. Fourth, this opening is part of a chain (the third of its kind in the capital, following openings in Soho and Borough market), and your correspondent demands higher standards from chains. Fifth, I am in an extremely foul mood, had you not twigged, having just had my latest in a series of contretemps with a fellow journalist.

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Ember Yard: Restaurant review - the team behind Salt Yard, Opera Tavern and Dehesa is back with more indulgent fare

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