Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and a news reporter. He writes a restaurant column for the Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Mondays), Independent and i (Fridays). He used to work on Channel 5's The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office; he is also a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has written a book called Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket's Greatest Spin Bowlers.

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War stories: witness accounts bring the horror of the Great War home

Editor's Letter: 100 moments that capture the horror of the Great War

It’s the business of journalists to tell stories about the world as it was, is, and will be

Menu Gordon Jones, restaurant review: Want to know where next Gordon Ramsay is hiding?

Menu Gordon Jones, 2 Wellsway, Bath, Tel: 01225 480 871. £160 for two for tasting menu with accompanying flight of wine

It is hard and getting harder, in Britain's lost decade of wage freezes, austerity and existential angst, to cope with the guilt when people discover that part of my job involves eating at great restaurants and writing about it. Generally, I somehow manage, and I have three crutches on which I lean when trying to give an account of myself in public.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne lays a brick during a visit to a Barratt Homes building site in Nuneaton, the day after he said in his annual budget that the government would extend the equity loan portion of the Help to Buy scheme for four years longer than planned to 2020

Editor's letter: A week to confirm the triumph of our gerontocracy

I have a theory about why those in their twenties get such a rough deal

London House, restaurant review: Fabulous, fantastic, formidable - any and all would describe Gordon Ramsay's latest

I think I've been doing this lark just long enough to know that when reviewing a Gordon Ramsay establishment, you're meant to start off with some long anecdote about how you crossed swords with the effing blond years ago, spat at him in his own restaurant, and vowed to destroy his evil business empire in your remaining days on earth, if it's the one thing you ever do. Alas, I'm a bit jejune for all that. So let's just crack on and talk about the food, shall we?

Former Labour MP Tony Benn arrives to lay a wreath at the Cenotaph on Whitehall at a Ceremony for the 204 dead Soldiers on August 17, 2009 in London, England.

Editor's letter on Tony Benn: Trying to do justice to a man who spent a life fighting for it

Our coverage reflects a character who had much more texture than was afforded by the caricature which his enemies propagated

Apicius, restaurant review: 'Enough panache to tempt me to move to Kent'

Cranbrook in Kent is the kind of place my generation is about to move to. It is almost within an hour's reach of London by rail and road, you can get more than a one-bedroom shoe box for half a million pounds, there are decent cricket pitches, it has an excellent co-ed grammar boarding school which sends kids to Oxbridge and, above all, there is a wonderful restaurant called Apicius, in which you can drown your sorrows with other parents after you've dropped off little Winston and Marla for the new school term.

Flourishing view: The festival is on a mission to celebrate the timeless bliss of getting lost in a book

Editor's letter: Festival celebrates literature, but also freedom itself

We are extremely lucky to have free expression in Britain

The homepage and one of the news pages on the new Independent app, now available on iPad

Editor's Letter: The best-designed newspaper, coming to a screen near you

The hope is that our journalism will be read and enjoyed by more people than ever

Bar Esteban, restaurant review: It's Brooklyn meets Barcelona in north London

On first impressions, and aside from the alliteration, there isn't much to unite Barcelona and Brooklyn. In fact, plenty separates them, not least the Atlantic. Barcelona: Gaudi, cava, Sonar festival, the Nou Camp. Brooklyn: brownstones in Fort Greene and Park Slope, a young Beckham, rye whisky, the notorious bridge. Then again, Hispanics and Latinos make up a fifth – and growing – portion of Brooklyn's population, albeit not many of them speak Catalan.

Caribbean time: the Pelican Bar

Jamaica: Knocked for six by a Caribbean curiosity

Hidden away on Treasure Beach is Jakes, a hotel with a history like no other. Honeymooner? Cricket fan? This is the place to come, says Amol Rajan

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Day In a Page

Ukraine crisis: The phoney war is over as Russian troops and armour pour across the border

The phoney war is over

Russian troops and armour pour into Ukraine
Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

Potatoes could be off the menu as crop pests threaten UK

The world’s entire food system is under attack - and Britain is most at risk, according to a new study
Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Gangnam smile: why the Chinese are flocking to South Korea to buy a new face

Seoul's plastic surgery industry is booming thanks to the popularity of the K-Pop look
From Mozart to Orson Welles: Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

Creative geniuses who peaked too soon

After the death of Sandy Wilson, 90, who wrote his only hit musical in his twenties, John Walsh wonders what it's like to peak too soon and go on to live a life more ordinary
Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Caught in the crossfire of a cyber Cold War

Fears are mounting that Vladimir Putin has instructed hackers to target banks like JP Morgan
Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years

Salomé: A head for seduction

Salomé's feminine wiles have inspired writers, painters and musicians for 2,000 years. Now audiences can meet the Biblical femme fatale in two new stage and screen projects
From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic

British Library celebrates all things Gothic

Forthcoming exhibition Terror and Wonder: The Gothic Imagination will be the UK's largest ever celebration of Gothic literature
The Hard Rock Café's owners are embroiled in a bitter legal dispute - but is the restaurant chain worth fighting for?

Is the Hard Rock Café worth fighting for?

The restaurant chain's owners are currently embroiled in a bitter legal dispute
Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival

In search of Caribbean soul food

Caribbean cuisine is becoming increasingly popular in the UK ... and there's more to it than jerk chicken at carnival
11 best face powders

11 best face powders

Sweep away shiny skin with our pick of the best pressed and loose powder bases
England vs Norway: Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Roy Hodgson's hands tied by exploding top flight

Lack of Englishmen at leading Premier League clubs leaves manager hamstrung
Angel Di Maria and Cristiano Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

Di Maria and Ronaldo: A tale of two Manchester United No 7s

They both inherited the iconic shirt at Old Trafford, but the £59.7m new boy is joining a club in a very different state
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone