Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and News Reporter. He writes a restaurant column for The Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Thursdays). He presents ‘Power Lunch’ on London Live TV (Thursdays), a one-to-one interview with the most influential people in the capital. Previously, Amol worked on Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office. He is currently a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has also written a book called ‘Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket’s Greatest Spin Bowlers’.

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Bishop's Dining Room, restaurant review: Will diners have a religious experience at Alex Tranquillo's elegant Norwich townhouse?

Many of you will no doubt be spiriting yourselves away to places new over the Easter weekend on a well-deserved break. But what to do when you get there and you're trundling along without a clue where to stop?

War stories: witness accounts bring the horror of the Great War home

Editor's Letter: 100 moments that capture the horror of the Great War

It’s the business of journalists to tell stories about the world as it was, is, and will be

Menu Gordon Jones, restaurant review: Want to know where next Gordon Ramsay is hiding?

Menu Gordon Jones, 2 Wellsway, Bath, Tel: 01225 480 871. £160 for two for tasting menu with accompanying flight of wine

It is hard and getting harder, in Britain's lost decade of wage freezes, austerity and existential angst, to cope with the guilt when people discover that part of my job involves eating at great restaurants and writing about it. Generally, I somehow manage, and I have three crutches on which I lean when trying to give an account of myself in public.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne lays a brick during a visit to a Barratt Homes building site in Nuneaton, the day after he said in his annual budget that the government would extend the equity loan portion of the Help to Buy scheme for four years longer than planned to 2020

Editor's letter: A week to confirm the triumph of our gerontocracy

I have a theory about why those in their twenties get such a rough deal

London House, restaurant review: Fabulous, fantastic, formidable - any and all would describe Gordon Ramsay's latest

I think I've been doing this lark just long enough to know that when reviewing a Gordon Ramsay establishment, you're meant to start off with some long anecdote about how you crossed swords with the effing blond years ago, spat at him in his own restaurant, and vowed to destroy his evil business empire in your remaining days on earth, if it's the one thing you ever do. Alas, I'm a bit jejune for all that. So let's just crack on and talk about the food, shall we?

Former Labour MP Tony Benn arrives to lay a wreath at the Cenotaph on Whitehall at a Ceremony for the 204 dead Soldiers on August 17, 2009 in London, England.

Editor's letter on Tony Benn: Trying to do justice to a man who spent a life fighting for it

Our coverage reflects a character who had much more texture than was afforded by the caricature which his enemies propagated

Apicius, restaurant review: 'Enough panache to tempt me to move to Kent'

Cranbrook in Kent is the kind of place my generation is about to move to. It is almost within an hour's reach of London by rail and road, you can get more than a one-bedroom shoe box for half a million pounds, there are decent cricket pitches, it has an excellent co-ed grammar boarding school which sends kids to Oxbridge and, above all, there is a wonderful restaurant called Apicius, in which you can drown your sorrows with other parents after you've dropped off little Winston and Marla for the new school term.

Flourishing view: The festival is on a mission to celebrate the timeless bliss of getting lost in a book

Editor's letter: Festival celebrates literature, but also freedom itself

We are extremely lucky to have free expression in Britain

The homepage and one of the news pages on the new Independent app, now available on iPad

Editor's Letter: The best-designed newspaper, coming to a screen near you

The hope is that our journalism will be read and enjoyed by more people than ever

Bar Esteban, restaurant review: It's Brooklyn meets Barcelona in north London

On first impressions, and aside from the alliteration, there isn't much to unite Barcelona and Brooklyn. In fact, plenty separates them, not least the Atlantic. Barcelona: Gaudi, cava, Sonar festival, the Nou Camp. Brooklyn: brownstones in Fort Greene and Park Slope, a young Beckham, rye whisky, the notorious bridge. Then again, Hispanics and Latinos make up a fifth – and growing – portion of Brooklyn's population, albeit not many of them speak Catalan.

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Day In a Page

Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Salisbury ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities

The city is home to one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, along with the world’s oldest mechanical clock
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album