Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and News Reporter. He writes a restaurant column for The Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Thursdays). He presents ‘Power Lunch’ on London Live TV (Thursdays), a one-to-one interview with the most influential people in the capital. Previously, Amol worked on Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office. He is currently a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has also written a book called ‘Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket’s Greatest Spin Bowlers’.

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Unless Ed Miliband agrees to “English votes for English laws”, the Tories will put the issue at the heart of their election manifesto

Editor's Letter: Does Miliband’s memory deserve sympathy or scorn?

The response to his gaffe has been scathing, but Labour's leader should have known better

TED, restaurant review: The menu is a triumph ... except for the side order of ethics

47-51 Caledonian Road, London N1, Tel: 020 3763 2080

Prince William, (R) his wife Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge (L) and their son Prince George

Editor's letter: A note on how we cover royal matters

A tinge of republicanism remains. But we are also deeply pragmatic

Cliff notes: the Grand Hotel Excelsior's pool

Grand Hotel Excelsior, Amalfi: Room service

Monsieur Gustave H would slot straight in
US President Barack Obama delivers a speech in Tallinn, Estonia

Editor's letter: Suddenly, America is no longer on top

Globalisation, which promised so much in the 1990s, is rolling back too

Michael Caines at Abode, restaurant review: Besmirching the name of a hero to chefs

Abode Exeter, Cathedral Yard, Exeter, Tel: 01392 319 955

David Cameron arrives at No 10 yesterday, after cutting short his holiday in Cornwall to hold a national security meeting on Iraq

Editor's Letter: August is anything but the silly season

In fact, it's the month when history speeds up

Primeur, restaurant review: The perfect home for gourmands to unwind in north London?

Barnes Motors, 116 Petherton Road, London N5
Ali shuffle: Moeen Ali of England celebrates dismissing Cheteshwar Pujara of India at Old Trafford

Amol Rajan: 'Don’t go to university because you think it’s the safest place to lose your virginity'

Once upon a time in a land far away, going to a British university was free and so everyone fancied a shot at it. But because everyone fancied a shot, and because successive governments wanted to expand the university sector to seem more egalitarian, lots more people did go to university. And then universities couldn’t cope, and asked for help, which is why Tony Blair introduced tuition fees which, over the coming years, will likely rise rather than fall.

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