Amol Rajan

Amol Rajan was appointed editor of The Independent in June 2013. He was previously Editor of Independent Voices, a comment, campaigns and community platform across print and digital. He was earlier Deputy Comment Editor, Sports News Correspondent and News Reporter. He writes a restaurant column for The Independent on Sunday, and has a column in the Evening Standard (Thursdays). He presents ‘Power Lunch’ on London Live TV (Thursdays), a one-to-one interview with the most influential people in the capital. Previously, Amol worked on Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff, and at the Foreign Office. He is currently a trustee of Prospex, a charity for young people in Islington. He has also written a book called ‘Twirlymen: the Unlikely History of Cricket’s Greatest Spin Bowlers’.

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Editor's Letter: I’m with Paxo - give people the facts and let them judge

Morning all. Channel 4 News carried a bit of television gold on Wednesday night. Jon Snow, who began presenting that programme in 1989, interviewed Jeremy Paxman, who began presenting Newsnight on BBC2 in the same year, but was retiring later that evening.

Isis rebels show their flag after seizing an army post

Editor's Letter: The horror in Iraq proves we were wrong to invade

This newspaper's anti-war stance made an Independent man of me

Beast, restaurant review: Give me attention to detail rather than 'conceptual dining'

'But sir, the concept is side-to-side," says the waitress, on seeing the horrified expression on my face. "What?! I want to be able to see Dominic's face over dinner," say I. "That's why people on dates usually sit opposite each other, not that this is a date. I mean, we're both married, me quite recently, as it happens." "But sir, the concept is..."

Roy Hodgson's England squad joins the other 31 teams at this year's World Cup

Editor's letter: Some top tips for those who fancy a flutter this summer

The World Cup promises four weeks of drama, excitement, convulsion and dismay

Rotorino, Beagle, restaurant reviews: Need a snapshot of the future of our capital city? Eat out in Hoxton, Shoreditch or Dalston

Rotorino, 434 Kingsland Road, London E8; Beagle, 397 Geffrye Street, London E2

Indian Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) supporters wait for the arrival of Narendra Modi

Editor’s Letter: Two nations with a shared history that are suddenly in flux

Some readers feel we have been unduly harsh on modern India and Narendra Modi

The Hole in the Wall, Primrose Farm Road, Little Wilbraham, Cambridgeshire

La Petite Maison, restaurant review: A treasure trove of gastronomic ideas in Devon

La Petite Maison, 35 Fore Street, Topsham, Exeter, Tel: 01392 873 660. £100 for two, with drinks

Editor's letter: Why we won’t stop making the case for immigration

The clinching argument for immigration is ultimately moral

Bishop's Dining Room, restaurant review: Will diners have a religious experience at Alex Tranquillo's elegant Norwich townhouse?

Many of you will no doubt be spiriting yourselves away to places new over the Easter weekend on a well-deserved break. But what to do when you get there and you're trundling along without a clue where to stop?

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Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine