Andreas Whittam Smith

Andreas Whittam Smith was a financial journalist until 1985 when he led the team that founded The Independent. The paper’s first editor (1986-1994), he has subsequently been the president of the British Board of Film Classification (1998-2002) and chairman of the Financial Ombudsman Service (1998-2003). He is currently First Church Estates Commissioner responsible for £5bn of the Church's investments, and chairman of the Children's Mutual.

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Brazil's head coach Luiz Felipe Scolari leads player Oscar off the pitch after the FIFA World Cup 2014 semi final match between Brazil and Germany at the Estadio Mineirao in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Mess up, and own up — The lesson from leading sportsmen that politicians would do well to heed

Our leaders should show more dignity in defeat

Is it about time we took the banks to task?

After Harris and Coulson, isn't it about time for a historic banking crime investigation?

After a string of unprecedented sex abuse and hacking trials, it would make sense

Rupert Murdoch and his ex-wife Wendi Deng

Rupert Murdoch should bear some responsibility for the crimes that the phone-hacking trial uncovered

The focus now turns to the man whose company owned the News of the World

If we are to punish lazy parents, then what about lazy governments?

They are more interested in announcements than delivery

Blair discusses what to do about Iraq with Mr Bush at the president's ranch in Crawford, Texas; April 6 2002

The truth will out about Blair and Iraq, whatever the Chilcot Inquiry ends up telling us

The families of the soldiers who died need to know if there was a worthy cause behind the war

The Independent has seen evidence of more than 60 EU nationals on the electoral roll being denied the chance to vote in the European elections

Here’s what we should do about political disengagement

If the parties want people to feel closer to politics, they should speak to their concerns – and bring them closer to the process

The success of Hinchingbrooke Hospital shows when the state should welcome the private sector - and when it shouldn't

What quality does Circle have that the big outsourcing companies do not?

Lord Patten’s tenure as Trust chairman coincided with turbulent times at the BBC

Paxman should be the next chair of the BBC

He thinks that the Corporation is ‘smug’, which seems like a good place to start

America’s rise and fall: Occupy Wall Street protesers march through New York City in 2011

What’s impressive about Thomas Piketty is his analysis not his politics

His book has become an unlikely bestseller, but his study of financial inequality is more than certain

Let's imagine the UK votes to leave the EU. What happens next?

It’s a realistic prospect, and now brilliant young diplomat Iain Mansfield has come up with the answer

Day In a Page

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice